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Celiac Disease and Broken Bones in Women over Fifty

International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005 - Received: 31 March 2004 / Accepted: 30 November, 2004 / Published online: 4 February 2005. Michael W. Davie, I. Gaywood, E. George, P.W. Jones, T. Masud, T. Price, G.D. Summers. International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2005 - Received: 31 March 2004 / Accepted: 30 November, 2004 / Published online: 4 February 2005.

Celiac.com 04/27/2006 - Because recent studies may have underestimated the association of celiac disease with fracture by studying patients with low fracture risk, doctors recently conducted a more comprehensive survey of celiac and non-celiac patients.

Their study of post-menopausal women over age 50 concluded that women diagnosed with celiac disease face an increased risk of fracture over time compared with control groups. The study looked at non-spinal fracture risk associated with celiac patients and non-celiac control groups in relation to the time-periods before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease.

According to the study, Celiac patients displayed greater fracture prevalence (odds ratio [OR], 1.51), confidence interval [CI], 1.13:2.02) and fracture after 50 years (OR, 2.20; CI, 1.49:3.25). The study compared Three hundred and eighty-three female celiac patients with 445 female controls, all over 50 years old. The mean age of celiacs tested was 61.4-67.8 years, and 62.7-69.9 years in controls. The celiac patients generally weighed less than the control patients of the same height.

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Among celiac patients diagnosed after age 50, no excess fracture risk was found in the period more than 10 years before diagnosis, but risk increased in the period from 10 years before diagnosis to 5 years after and remained high more than 5 years after diagnosis (p<0.05).

Adjusted for height and weight, instance of wrist fracture between the groups was about the same, but celiacs did have more multiple fractures (OR, 2.96; CI, 1.81:4.83). Further, while women diagnosed before age fifty, showed no excess fracture risk, those celiac patients more than five years beyond their diagnosis faced increased risk of wrist fractures ( p<0.05).

While women diagnosed with celiac disease before age 50 faced no greater risk than their non-celiac peers, for those diagnosed after age fifty, the risk of fracture increases as the years pass, with the greatest statistical increase occurring five to ten years after a diagnosis.

Accordingly, thin women over 50 who suffer from multiple fractures should consider being tested for celiac disease. If the diagnosis is positive, they should take measures to ensure proper calcium and vitamin D intake.

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1 Response:

 
Helen Bricker
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
09 Dec 2009 5:55:33 AM PDT
I have osteoporosis as well as celiac disease. It's a pity that celiac was not discovered twenty years earlier with me.
Keep up the good work, let someone else benefit from my experimentation period.




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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hey All, I was wondering if anyone has tried gluten free pizza? I'm specifically talking about the store bought kind. I'm looking for a cheat meal - I've been eating mainly non processed fresh food but I need a little something to stay sane every now and then. I'm from New York so i'd say I have a pretty high standard of pizza lol. Are there any good frozen ones that are worth eating? I don't think i've ever eaten a frozen pizza in my life but I don't particularly have the time right now to make my own. Also while I'm posting I figure i'll ask. I'm going to this event with my friend at her work. It's like a dinner party. How do I navigate this situation food wise? Should I just eat at home and get drinks there or plan to eat there but take snacks just in case nothing seems safe? Thanks guys!

Hi Dalek, JMG has it right, any food with wheat, rye or barley is a gluten containing food. In addition, watch out for malt, which is sometimes made from barley. That includes the malt in beers.

Interesting!! I'm going to share that with her dr. I'll have to look into the gluten sensitivity more myself, the main reason we started testing is due to poor growth. As I learned more, I've seen several symptoms that could be explained by celiac. I like feeling informed so I'll know what to talk to the dr about or ask about. I think those are the results we are waiting for still, I couldn't remember the name.

Call your doctor's office and ask them to relay your request to the doctor to amend the test request, they should be able to sort it without an additional meeting and delay. Worth a try anyway I think the Biocard tests TTG IGA and it may give you an indication. Do post your results here as I'm sure others will be interested in its effectiveness. If it's negative however remember that there are several celiac tests for a reason. Some test on one, some on another etc... However my guess is your doctor will dismiss them and want their own testing. That's the usual experience.

Waiting for the EMA, I bet. Keep advocating! this is interesting. If celiac disease is excluded, she might still have a gluten sensitivity. There just is not specific test for that. http://theglutensummittranscripts.s3.amazonaws.com/Dr_Umberto_Volta.pdf