No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

The Cause of Liver Damage in People with Celiac Disease by Roy Jamron

Celiac.com 05/31/2006 - I previously discussed how liver abnormalities are highly prevalent in celiac disease. Why damage to the liver occurs is unknown, and gluten toxicity and increased intestinal permeability have been proposed as factors. The following free full text article appearing in the current issue of Gastroenterology may shed light on why liver damage occurs in celiacs.

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) reside on the surface of many cells which participate in the immune system. TLRs sense molecules present in pathogens but not the host, and when the immune system senses these molecules, chemicals are released which set off inflammatory and anti-pathogen responses. One class of molecules recognized by TLRs and common to most pathogenic bacteria is lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

Gluten increases intestinal permeability in celiacs. The disruption of the intestinal barrier permits endotoxins, such as LPS, from gut bacteria to reach the portal vein of the liver triggering a TLR response from immune cells in the liver. Proinflammatory mediators are released cascading into the release of more chemicals leading to inflammation and liver damage. This may be the cause of liver damage in celiacs. Gluten itself could also trigger a liver immune response. Kupffer cells in the liver are capable of antigen presentation to T cells, along with liver dendritic cells, and could initiate a T cell response to gluten within the liver.

Ads by Google:

The following article is somewhat technical, but discusses the role of various liver cells involved in the immune process and how intestinal permeability and TLRs contribute to liver injury. The article is a good read and provides valuable information about the liver I have not seen elsewhere.

Gastroenterology Volume 130, Issue 6, Pages 1886-1900 (May 2006)
Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in the Liver
Robert F. Schwabe, Ekihiro Seki, David A. Brenner

Free Full Text:
http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/PIIS0016508506000655/fulltext

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
an unknown user
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Oct 2007 3:49:10 PM PST
I have celiac disease and my liver tests are elevated,and this makes me feel better knowing that I could reverse this. thank-you!!!

 
Jasmin Krause
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Jun 2008 4:09:32 PM PST
This article has been so insightful and I am so grateful for someone like Roy S. Jamron for putting so much effort and research into this disease process. The doctors were baffled why my daughters liver enzymes were elevated. Thanks to this article I have been given clarity and hope. Thank you.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


I feel the same. Every so often, someone will roll their eyes. I try not to discuss it unless I have to, only because I don't love having the topic of conversation become me, but others seem genuinely curious. Every so often I have a pity party over not being able to just pick up a sandwich a...

I can't remember, but it was a few years ago and maybe it had Maltodextrin in it, or maybe it was the 'flavorings' - which I never eat unless it's from a company like Kraft or McCormick that labels clearly. But given that you eat it safely, maybe I'll contact the company for a clear answer.

So the simple explanation is - You eat gluten. It travels along and gets to your small intestine. For some reason, your small intestine feels it is an invader. but instead of making antibodies that "attack" the gluten, the small intestine cells make antibodies that attack itself. Sort of misg...

Hi - I think some of the issue here may be stemming from confusion about the word "exposed" and the two things in bold above -- while you are very strict about eating gluten, am I right that you've been accidentally eating some and for the past month have accidentally been not-gluten-free? If so...

my thinking was that if I ate gluten tonight again , then the reaction would be there tomorrow not that there would be gluten for them to find exactly. So from what your saying It would make sense - i.e. if my body was going to react to gluten with antibodies then by eating gluten say tonight it ...