No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Older Celiac Disease Patients on a Gluten-Free Diet Slower to Recover by Roy Jamron

Celiac.com 07/31/2006 - A two-year study in the July 2006 Endoscopy showed older celiac patients on a gluten-free diet have an incomplete histological recovery even after two years. Only the younger patients (5 - 30 years) showed significant improvement of histology within 12 months (P < 0.034); older patients (>30 years) showed histological improvement but this was not statistically significant, even after 24 months on a gluten-free diet. This study was also previously discussed in an article by Dr. Antonio Tursi in the Spring 2006 Celiac.com Scott-Free Newsletter.

This also means increased intestinal permeability and associated problems such as liver damage may continue to be a lasting problem in older patients beyond two years on a gluten-free diet. Below is the abstract:

Endoscopy 2006 July; 38(7): 702-707
Endoscopic and histological findings in the duodenum of adults with celiac disease before and after changing to a gluten-free diet: a 2-year prospective study
Tursi, A.; Brandimarte, G.; Giorgetti, G. M.; Elisei, W.; Inchingolo, C. D.; Monardo, E.; Aiello, F.

Ads by Google:

Background and study aims: Published follow-up data on small-intestinal recovery in patients with celiac disease are scarce and contradictory. This is especially the case for adult patients, who often show incomplete histological recovery after starting a gluten-free diet (GFD). We conducted a 2-year prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of a GFD in improving the endoscopic and histological duodenal findings in adults with celiac disease.

Patients and methods: We studied 42 consecutive adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease (13 men, 29 women; mean age 32.7 years, range 15 - 72 years). All the patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and small bowel biopsy. We devised our own grading system for the endoscopic appearance of the duodenum, which ranged from "normal" appearance to "mild", "moderate", or "severe" alterations. Small bowel biopsies were obtained from the second part of the duodenum (and from the duodenal bulb when it had a micronodular appearance). The histopathological appearances were described according to modified Marsh criteria.

Results: A normal endoscopic appearance in the duodenum was found in 5/42 patients (11.9 %) at entry and in 32/42 patients (76.2 %) after 2 years on a GFD. Subdividing the patients according to age, patients aged from 15 years to 60 years showed significant improvement within 12 months (P < 0.0001 for patients aged from 15 years to 45 years; P < 0.003 for patients in the 46 years to 60 years group), whereas the improvement in endoscopic findings in patients older than 60 years was not statistically significant, even 24 months after starting the GFD. "Normal" histology was reported in none of the patients at entry, but in 25 patients (59.5 %) after 24 months on a GFD, but this parameter did not show a significant improvement until the patients had been on the GFD for 12 months (P < 0.0001). Only the younger patients (5 - 30 years) showed significant improvement of histology within 12 months (P < 0.034); older patients (>30 years) showed histological improvement but this was not statistically significant, even after 24 months on a GFD.

Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that endoscopic recovery is faster than histological recovery in adults with celiac disease who go on a GFD. Moreover, older patients showed incomplete endoscopic and histological recovery even 24 months after starting a GFD. We therefore advise, as a minimum recommendation, that follow-up biopsies should be taken 1 - 2 years after starting a GFD in adults with celiac disease.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Getting a celiac disease diagnosis is shocking. Expect to go through all the stages of grief. Your best defense is to learn how to read labels, avoid cross contamination and consider eating as few processed foods for a few weeks. It may speed healing (wish someone would have advised me to do s...

That is very helpful. Thank you so much.

I would read it as ?high?. In any case, you were positive on the TTG and the DGP. You only need one positive. I had pretty severe intestinal damage and never even had a positive on the EMA or the TTG even when they were re-run several times during follow-up visits.

Thank you! That does help. I was just confused about the ?negative? under the EMA Titer when my level says ?1:40 high?. Any insight there? Just wondering if it?s further confirming or denying? I first thought confirming.

Thank you! That does help. I was just confused about the ?negative? under the EMA Titer when my level says ?1:40 high?. Any insight there?