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Barley Enzymes Effectively Digest Gluten in Rats

Celiac.com 09/12/2006 – A recent study by researchers at Stanford University has found that barley endoprotease EP-B2 is effective at digesting gluten in rats, and should be studied further as an “adjunct to diet control” in human celiac disease patients. This new finding adds to Stanford’s growing body of work on enzyme therapy as a possible treatment for those with celiac disease, and may one day lead to a effective treatment.

Effect of barley endoprotease EP-B2 on gluten digestion in the intact rat.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2006 Sep;318(3):1178-86.
Gass J, Vora H, Bethune MT, Gray GM, Khosla C.
Stanford University.

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Abstract:
"Celiac Sprue is a multi-factorial disease characterized by an intestinal inflammatory response to ingested gluten. Proteolytically resistant gluten peptides from wheat, rye and barley persist in the intestinal lumen, and elicit an immune response in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we demonstrate the in vivo ability of a gluten-digesting protease ("glutenase") to accelerate the breakdown of a gluten-rich solid meal. The proenzyme form of endoprotease B, isoform 2 from Hordeum vulgare (EP-B2) was orally administered to adult rats with a solid meal containing 1 g gluten. Gluten digestion in the stomach and small intestine was monitored as a function of enzyme dose and time by HPLC and mass spectrometry. In the absence of supplementary EP-B2, gluten was solubilized and proteolyzed to a limited extent in the stomach, and was hydrolyzed and assimilated mostly in the small intestine. In contrast, EP-B2 was remarkably effective at digesting gluten in the rat stomach in a dose and time dependent fashion. At a 1:25 EP-B2:gluten dose, the gastric concentration of the highly immunogenic 33-mer gliadin peptide reduced by more than 50-fold within 90 min, with no overt signs of toxicity. Evaluation of EP-B2 as an adjunct to diet control is therefore warranted in celiac patients."

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Hey All, I was wondering if anyone has tried gluten free pizza? I'm specifically talking about the store bought kind. I'm looking for a cheat meal - I've been eating mainly non processed fresh food but I need a little something to stay sane every now and then. I'm from New York so i'd say I have a pretty high standard of pizza lol. Are there any good frozen ones that are worth eating? I don't think i've ever eaten a frozen pizza in my life but I don't particularly have the time right now to make my own. Also while I'm posting I figure i'll ask. I'm going to this event with my friend at her work. It's like a dinner party. How do I navigate this situation food wise? Should I just eat at home and get drinks there or plan to eat there but take snacks just in case nothing seems safe? Thanks guys!

Hi Dalek, JMG has it right, any food with wheat, rye or barley is a gluten containing food. In addition, watch out for malt, which is sometimes made from barley. That includes the malt in beers.

Interesting!! I'm going to share that with her dr. I'll have to look into the gluten sensitivity more myself, the main reason we started testing is due to poor growth. As I learned more, I've seen several symptoms that could be explained by celiac. I like feeling informed so I'll know what to talk to the dr about or ask about. I think those are the results we are waiting for still, I couldn't remember the name.

Call your doctor's office and ask them to relay your request to the doctor to amend the test request, they should be able to sort it without an additional meeting and delay. Worth a try anyway I think the Biocard tests TTG IGA and it may give you an indication. Do post your results here as I'm sure others will be interested in its effectiveness. If it's negative however remember that there are several celiac tests for a reason. Some test on one, some on another etc... However my guess is your doctor will dismiss them and want their own testing. That's the usual experience.

Waiting for the EMA, I bet. Keep advocating! this is interesting. If celiac disease is excluded, she might still have a gluten sensitivity. There just is not specific test for that. http://theglutensummittranscripts.s3.amazonaws.com/Dr_Umberto_Volta.pdf