No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Barley Enzymes Effectively Digest Gluten in Rats

Celiac.com 09/12/2006 – A recent study by researchers at Stanford University has found that barley endoprotease EP-B2 is effective at digesting gluten in rats, and should be studied further as an “adjunct to diet control” in human celiac disease patients. This new finding adds to Stanford’s growing body of work on enzyme therapy as a possible treatment for those with celiac disease, and may one day lead to a effective treatment.

Effect of barley endoprotease EP-B2 on gluten digestion in the intact rat.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2006 Sep;318(3):1178-86.
Gass J, Vora H, Bethune MT, Gray GM, Khosla C.
Stanford University.

Ads by Google:

Abstract:
"Celiac Sprue is a multi-factorial disease characterized by an intestinal inflammatory response to ingested gluten. Proteolytically resistant gluten peptides from wheat, rye and barley persist in the intestinal lumen, and elicit an immune response in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we demonstrate the in vivo ability of a gluten-digesting protease ("glutenase") to accelerate the breakdown of a gluten-rich solid meal. The proenzyme form of endoprotease B, isoform 2 from Hordeum vulgare (EP-B2) was orally administered to adult rats with a solid meal containing 1 g gluten. Gluten digestion in the stomach and small intestine was monitored as a function of enzyme dose and time by HPLC and mass spectrometry. In the absence of supplementary EP-B2, gluten was solubilized and proteolyzed to a limited extent in the stomach, and was hydrolyzed and assimilated mostly in the small intestine. In contrast, EP-B2 was remarkably effective at digesting gluten in the rat stomach in a dose and time dependent fashion. At a 1:25 EP-B2:gluten dose, the gastric concentration of the highly immunogenic 33-mer gliadin peptide reduced by more than 50-fold within 90 min, with no overt signs of toxicity. Evaluation of EP-B2 as an adjunct to diet control is therefore warranted in celiac patients."

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


raven, thought of you when i read this post. it is important that we all remember that DQ 2+8 DO NOT cover ALL celiacs, and probably less than is actually claimed.

your doc sounds like a keeper.

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/423327 Found this article that suggests a link between PD and the Mthfr genes (which are also associated with Celiac Disease). Taking methyl forms of B9 (methylfolate) and B12 (methylcobalamine), and B6 (P5P), makes these vitamin...

I'm not sure that this is the original study I looked at, but it does describe the different antibodies found circulating in the blood that is specific to DH (anti-eTG, which is analogous to anti-tTG in regular celiac disease). At any rate, it seems that they can test for it, but many labs do not...

Welcome. You might consider staying on gluten and seeing your doctor for a celiac blood test panel. You need to be consuming gluten for several weeks prior to the blood draw otherwise the tests can be invalid. You could have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity. The only way to know for ...