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Andes Crème de Menthe Chunk Cookies (Gluten-Free)

This recipe comes to us from Michelle Ackley.

Ingredients:
½ cup salted butter, softened
¾ cup packed, brown sugar
½ cup white granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 eggs
1 package Andes Baking Chips (substitute a bag of the baking chip of your choice, and the recipe works out equally well)
1 and 1/3 cups white rice flour
1 and 1/3 cups tapioca flour
1 teaspoon Xanthan gum

Directions:
I use a stand mixer with the paddle attachment for this, however a hand held mixer could, of course be used. Starting at low speed and then moving up to the highest speed as ingredients are incorporated, cream together the butter, sugars, baking soda, baking powder, Xanthan gum, vanilla and eggs until fluffy and lightened in color, scraping down the sides of the bowl at least twice during beating.

Turn off mixer, scrap down the bowl again and add the entire bag of baking chips. Use the lowest stir level to incorporate the chips into the mix, turn off mixer. Add all of the flours to the bowl, and mix again at low speed just until incorporated. Place all of the dough into a gallon sized zip bag or wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and chill in the refrigerator at least one hour. (Do not try to skip the refrigeration. Chilling for longer is fine. I have found that baking up small batches and storing the remainder in the refrigerator for several days works very well.)

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When ready to bake take a small spoonful of dough and roll between your palms to form a ball. Place on a greased cookie sheet and slightly flatten with your palm. These cookies turn out the softest and chewiest when made quite small, mine are usually between the size of a quarter and a half dollar after flattening. Try to make them all about the same size to aid baking.

Bake in a 350F degree oven for 8 to 10 minutes, do not over-bake. Cookies are done when they are no longer glossy and are just starting to lightly brown on the edges. Let stand on the cookie sheet for 2 minutes before transferring to cooling racks. These soft cookies stay soft for days!

I have found that a bag of Ghirardelli chocolate chips substituted for the Andes Chips makes an out of this world chocolate chip cookie. Experiment with your favorite baking chips!

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2 Responses:

 
Imogen Ccrss
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said this on
11 Aug 2008 2:50:48 AM PDT
Some baking powder contains Gluten so to use this recipe you would have to by gluten free ingredients first!!

 
Michelle Ackley
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
12 Aug 2011 6:03:09 PM PDT
To Imogen, I would just note that of course all gluten free ingredients would have to be used for any recipe on this site, though it is possible to get gluten free baking powder, you can even make your own if you like, just do a google search on it! Saying gluten free baking powder on this site, to me, is a bit redundant... but for anyone interested in trying the recipe, yes, you should use gluten free baking powder, please don't let that keep you from trying these soft yummy cookies!




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^^^^^^ good info, tips and tricks^^^^^^^^^ yes, crumbs will make you sick. also, breathing flour/pancake mix, etc that is in the air because eventually, you're going to swallow some.

Hello I was diagnosed Dec 15 of last year and went totally gluten-free the next day. I actually got worse before I got better - it's a steep learning curve - but now, 4 1/2 months later I'm finally seeing improvement. Hang in there.

Called my GI doctor today to make sure he is going to look at my small intestine and do biopsy for Celiac for my EGD and he is. Thanks for the tip everyone about have to start eating gluten again. The office told me to break my gluten free diet and start eating gluten everyday until my EGD. Here's to being miserable again for a few weeks ???

I can completely relate! The horrible mental effects that I have been living with for years is the absolute worst side effect of eating gluten, HANDS DOWN. Worse than the endless tummy aches, worse than the constant diarrhea, worse than the week long migraines, worse than the daily fatigue and body pain.... I honestly though there was something seriously wrong with me and hated my life because of how I felt mentally. I always felt like I was drowning, not in control of my thoughts, trapped in some unexplained misery. My head was always so cloudy, and I was mad because I always felt so slow and stupid. I would feel so lethargic and sad and empty while at the same time be raging inside, wanting to rip out of my own skin. I was mean, terrible, would snap at the people closest to me for no good reason and just felt like I hated everyone and everything. Think of how crappy you feel when you have a terrible cold and flu - I felt that crappy, but mentally. Some days were really bad, some were mild. I always thought it was because I was getting a migraine, or because I had a migraine, or because I had just overcome a migraine, because I didn't sleep well, because....always a random reason to justify why we have all these weird unrelated symptoms before we get diagnosed. I'm happy to say that I have been gluten-free for about 2 months now and though I am not symptom free, the first thing that improved was my mood. I no longer feel foggy and miserable. For the first time in years, my head is clear, I can actually think, and I feel positive and like I am in control of what's going on in my head. I don't hate the world. I don't spend every day bawled up on the corner of the couch depressed and angry. The release of these horrible symptoms is enough to never make me want to cheat, no matter what I have to miss out on. So insane how a little minuscule amount of a stupid protein can wreck such havoc.

I wanted to collect some of the info on NCGI in one place so that visitors who test negative but may still have an issue with gluten can be directed there. I'll add to this post as I find new links, but feel free to add or contribute anything you think may be of use! Matt --- Useful links: An overview from Alessio Fasano, one of the world's leading researchers on celiac and gluten sensitivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvfTV57iPUY Umberto Volta, another leading researcher in the field gives some of the latest findings about NCGI: Presentation slides from Dr Volta's visit to Coeliac UK - NCGS about halfway through A scholarly overview from celiac disease magazine: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Knut_Lundin/publication/232528784_Non-celiac_Gluten_Sensitivity/links/09e415098bbe37c05b000000.pdf A good overview from a sceptical but fair perspective: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/a-balanced-look-at-gluten-sensitivity/ Another overview: https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-2/ University of Chicago's excellent celiac site's take: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/category/faq-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity/ A compelling account in the British Medical Journal from an NCGI patient: http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e7982 Here's some positive news about a potential new test: http://www.medicaldaily.com/non-celiac-gluten-insensitivity-blood-test-392850 NCGI in children: NCGI and auto immune study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26026392 Also consider: Fodmaps: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/research/divisions/dns/projects/fodmaps/faq.aspx This Monash study: http://fodmapmonash.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/the-truth-behind-non-celiac-gluten.html suggested some who think they're reacting to gluten should actually be reducing fodmaps Sibo: http://www.webmd.boots.com/digestive-disorders/small-intestinal-bacteria-sibo