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Lemon Layer Cake (Gluten-Free)

This recipe comes to us from Annalise Roberts with a slight flour mix change by Sue Foss.

If any cake could be called refreshing, this would be the one. Rich but light.

Ingredients for cake layers:
1 cup canola oil, plus additional for greasing cake pans
2 ½ cups brown rice flour mix (1 cup brown rice, 1½ cup white rice flour)
½ cup tapioca, ½ cup potato starch
½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon xanthan gum
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 tablespoon finely grated fresh lemon zest
2 cups granulated sugar
4 large eggs
For lemon curd
2 teaspoons finely grated fresh lemon zest
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
3 large egg yolks
¼ teaspoon guar gum
½ stick (¼ cup) unsalted butter, cut into tablespoon pieces
¼ teaspoon lemon extract

Ingredients for lemon frosting:
2 sticks (1 cup) unsalted butter, softened
3 ½ cups confectioners sugar
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
½ teaspoon lemon extract
2 teaspoons finely grated fresh lemon zest
Special equipment: 2 (9- by 2-inch) round cake pans

Directions to make cake layers:
Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 350°F. Brush cake pans with canola oil. Line bottom of each pan with a round of parchment or wax paper, then oil paper.

Whisk together flour mix, salt, baking powder, and Xanthan gum until combined well. Stir together milk, canola oil (1 cup), vanilla, and zest in another bowl.

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Beat together sugar and eggs in a large bowl with an electric mixer at medium speed just until combined, about 1 minute. Reduce speed to low and add flour and milk mixtures alternately in batches, beginning and ending with flour mixture and mixing until just combined.

Divide batter evenly between cake pans, smoothing tops, and bake until a wooden pick or skewer inserted in center of each cake layer comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes.

Cool cake layers in pans on racks 10 minutes. Run a thin knife around edge of 1 cake layer and invert rack over cake pan, then invert cake onto rack. Repeat with second layer. Peel off paper and cool layers completely.

Curd Directions:
Whisk together zest, lemon juice, sugar, yolks, a pinch of salt, and guar gum in a 1-quart heavy saucepan. Add butter and cook over moderately low heat, whisking constantly, until curd is thick enough to hold marks of whisk and first bubbles appear on surface, about 5 minutes. Whisk in extract. Immediately pour curd into a bowl, then cover surface with wax paper and chill until cold, about 30 minutes.

Frosting Directions:
Beat butter with an electric mixer at high speed until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Reduce speed to low and add confectioners sugar, lemon juice, extract, and zest, then mix until creamy and smooth, about 2 minutes.

Frost cake:
Halve each cake layer horizontally using a long serrated knife. Spread bottom half of each cake layer with half of lemon curd, then top with remaining cake layers to form two sandwiched cakes. Put 1 sandwiched cake on a cake stand or platter and spread a heaping ½ cup frosting over top, then cover with remaining sandwiched cake. Frost top and sides of cake with remaining frosting.

Cooks notes:

  • Cake layers can be made (but not halved) 1 day ahead and cooled completely, then kept, wrapped well in plastic wrap, at room temperature.
  • Lemon curd can be chilled up to 3 days.
  • Cake can be completely assembled and frosted 4 hours ahead and kept at room temperature, or 1 day ahead and chilled, loosely covered. Bring to room temperature before serving.

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3 Responses:

 
M. Sayler

said this on
09 Jul 2008 2:26:11 PM PDT
This is a Gourmet recipe published in November of 2005 using brown rice flour from Authentic Foods because it didn't make it gritty and had a nice flavor.

 
Kristy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
03 Apr 2010 11:11:32 PM PDT
Made this cake and it turned out great! Everyone was surprised that a gluten free cake could taste so good.

 
Amy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
14 Aug 2010 2:17:51 PM PDT
This is my daughter's favorite birthday cake!




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Thank you for taking the time for sharing that info. Don't we have the best disease ever! There's got to be a better way to cut down the scarring. Yes, I've scratched till it bleed. Can't help it. It's like having a bunch of mosquito bites. Yes, only gluten free now. Still have bursts, so probably am being exposed to gluten. Will need to stop dapsone soon. Good luck with your situation.

Best Foods or Hellman's on the East Oast is Gluten free. You can make your own too! Easy! http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/mayonnaise-recipe I buy any brand of sugar.

Are you sure you do not have fractures? I fractured two vertebrae two months after my celiac disease diagnosis DOING NOTHING!!!! Turns out I have osteoporosis from untreated celiac disease. ? Consider a bone scan.

Be sure to let us know how it goes! Help keep them in business by writing a review on Find Me Gluten Free! Enjoy! ?

I'm a naturalist -- I don't use drugs, creams, etc. I do, however, scratch** the rash until I'm almost bleeding and then dump isopropyl alcohol in it -- that relieves the itch for quite some time. (Stings at first though.) I get the rashes on my legs. ANYWAY, I have found that a gluten-free diet is the only (or best) approach -- it's certainly the most natural, in my opinion. It took six months before I felt I was cleansed of gluten. I went nine months (or more) without a rash. Then, I mistakenly ate some soup with barley in it. Got the rash. I let it run its course while getting back to & staying on a gluten-free diet. My best advice is just to stay on a gluten-free diet. Be strong, brave. You can do it! ** I should clarify that when my rashes start itching, I can't help but scratch (excessively). I am not suggesting scratching yourself (with or without cause) as a means to an end. Don't scratch if you can.