No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Prolyl Endoprotease Enzyme May Allow Patients with Celiac Disease to Safely Eat Gluten on Occasion

Enzyme Quickly Breaks Down Wheat Protein

Celiac.com 05/23/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the journal Gut suggest that the enzyme prolyl endoprotease from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP) taken along with meals might allow patients with celiac disease to safely consume gluten on occasion.

The negative effects of celiac disease are due in large part to an immune response to gluten.

Because proline-rich gluten proteins resist the digestive enzymes of the gastro-intestinal tract, they are very likely suspects in the generation of this immune response.

A team of doctors in the Netherlands set out to assess the abilities of a post-proline cutting enzyme, prolyl endoprotease from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP) in breaking down gluten. The research team was made up of doctors Cristina Mitea (1), Robert Havenaar (2), Jan Wouter Drijfhout (1), Luppo Edens (3), Liesbeth Dekking (1)* and Frits Koning (1).

The study was not performed on actual celiac patients, but used a dynamic system that mimics the human gastrointestinal tract (TIM system). Using the TIM system, the team performed two experiments. The first used the TIM-system to process a slice of bread with and without the presence of AN-PEP. The second experiment used the TIM-system to process standard fast food items, again both with and without the presence of AN-PEP.

Ads by Google:

Samples of the digesting food were taken from the TIM systems stomach, duodenum, jejunum and ileum compartments from zero to four hours after the beginning of the experiment. These samples were evaluated for levels of immunogenic peptides from gliadins and glutenins by monoclonal antibody based competition assays, Western blot analysis and proliferation T-cell assays.

Results of both experiments showed that AN-PEP broke down gluten in the stomach so effectively that almost no gluten reached the duodenum compartment. Because these results show that AN-PEP is capable of speeding the breakdown of gluten in a gastrointestinal system that closely mimics live digestion, the team concluded that AN-PEP might offer celiac patients an opportunity to stray from their strict gluten free diets from time to time.

Participating Institutions:
1 Dept of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion,
Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands.
2 TNO Quality of Life, Zeist, Netherlands
3 DSM Food Specialties, Delft, Netherlands

Gut. Published Online First: 9 May 2007. doi:10.1136/gut.2006.111609

health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Cecily Baldwin
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
09 Feb 2008 10:06:32 AM PDT
Thought this article was interesting and helpful, as I had been researching AN-PEP and was finding it hard to find anything other than totally clinical or repeat articles. Thanks for this one. Easy to read and understand.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

I would say get retested, to be sure, do a gluten challenge with her where she eats gluten for 12 weeks, not much just a half slice of bread a day or a wheat cracker for the blood test and 2 weeks for the biopsy. You mentioned bumps, and dry patches...this might be DH from celiacs and if it is you can go to a dermatologist and they can test it. In some people with DH reactions to gluten, their intestines do not show much damage as most of the antibodies are directed elsewhere. In this case you would have your symptoms. Now Celiac is a autoimmune disease that commonly has other auto immune diseases associated with it. NOW if your daughter has the gene for it she could have another automimmune disease I am not very familiar with and someone else might be able to help you more on suggestions for testing. Now in my personal opinion it sounds like she was still getting into gluten when you said she was off of it. NOTE gluten is a tricky bugger, it is a protein smaller then a germ that can stick in cracks and scratches on all your utensils, food prep area, knifes, etc. As a flour it can hang in the air for hours and even be inhaled effecting some of us. It is present in a lot of things we do not consider, like makeup, playdough, shampoos, seasonings, sauces, even some dry wall spackles. Now if she is in a shared house hold with other kids and not everyone is on this diet she has likely been getting into gluten somewhere, like touching glutened surfaces the other kids touched after eating gluten foods then putting her hand in her mouth or on safe foods. Or just randomly eating gluten foods, note symptoms can last weeks and wane from how it is effecting you. It does not take much to trigger symptoms you might have to be more careful and move her to a whole foods only diet, and have a separate prep area, utensils, cooking zone for her if you wish to keep fixing separate meals for her vs the gluten family. I would suggest just changing the entire family over, anyway perhaps start with a separate fold out table, use freezer paper to line the prep area, a microwave, mini toaster oven, and some microwave cook ware like steamers, steam bags, etc. and using gloves to fix her meals. She will need her own condiment jars (crumbs in hte jars) and area for safe snacks. I would suggest getting her only gluten-free CERTIFIED FOODS for now. You can find some whole food healthy snacks at mygerbs.com, and a few other places. I will provide a link to gluten-free food list. PERHAPS you can change the entire family over....now days it is more like changing brands as everything you used to eat is available in a gluten-free brand. ALSO have a lot of dairy free options there. https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/

Hi wondering if someone could help. my daughter has mildly raised TTG levels and the gliadine levels, she has one Coeliacs gene, but her biopsy came back negative. We have kept her off gluten (and low dairy) for nearly a year to see if her symptoms improved. They haven't. But I don't know if they are related to gluten specifically. Just wondering if anyone has other suggestions that may be going on with her. Her symptoms are: - Short stature, she's nearly 9 and my 6 year old boy is nearly bigger than her - bumps on back of her arms - urine leaking and occasional soiled pants, which could be from constipation she has at time's - sticking out stomach - dry patchy rashes on her face - joint pain sporadically - vomits every 6 weeks, but hasn't had gluten and seems to be no food connection - reoccurring thrush She had gluten last night at a party and was fine today. I'm a bit lost and not sure where else to turn. Thanks for any help.

We have gone gluten free, our whole house, as of a month ago. It was pretty seamless since I had been gluten-free for 5 months last year. I have found many good recipes, and my picky husband and one of my boys who is also a picky eater, even prefer many gluten-free recipes to the regular ones. My husband did see my point about the size of the gluten protein means nothing. Its a gluten protein period, that's what you are avoiding. It doesn't matter if its hiding in the scratch of your baking sheet and you can't see it. You can't see the wind, but it's still there. I hear you on the anemia. I've been anemic for several years, I just thought it as because I was getting a little older. Has your anemia gone away or do you still have problems with it?

Ennis, it is made out of metal, coated with plastic I think. You have such a hard time, my heart really hurts for you. But you are such a support to those on this board, and a great teacher for those of us who are new.

Thanks everyone! I think its hard for people to fully accept because they cant see the damage it does every time you get glutened. It's invisible. Im glad to know I wasnt being paranoid. I sure was when I was first diagnosed. I laugh at myself now, but its a pretty steep learning curve.