No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Study Shows High Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

Celiac.com 06/08/2007 - This study shows that celiac disease is as common among British Columbians with Type 1 diabetes as it is in Europeans with Type 1 Diabetes.

The research team was made up of doctors P.M. Gillett, H.R. Gillett, D.M. Israel, D.L. Metzger, L. Stewart, J-P. Chanoine, H.J. Freeman.

The team looked at 233 children with Type1 diabetes. In a blind study, the children were screened for celiac disease using immunoglublin A endomysium antibody (EmA), and the Immunoglublin A tissue transglutaminase. Children with positive results were offered small bowel biopsies. For those confirmed with celiac disease, doctors recommended a gluten-free diet.

British Columbians with Type 1 Diabetes Get Celiac Disease at Rates Comparable to their European Counterparts

Nineteen children tested positive for EmA and showed elevated tTG levels. Of the 18 patients who agreed to biopsies, one was normal, three showed normal morphology with elevated Intraepithelial lymphocyte counts, and 14 biopsies showed morphological changes consistent with celiac disease.

9 of the 19 children who tested positive for EmA were asymptomatic. Seven patients showed only mildly elevated tTG levels. Of this second group, five refused biopsy and two showed normal biopsies.

Ads by Google:

In addition to the four known cases, the doctors uncovered at least 14 new cases of celiac disease. The total rate of biopsy confirmed celiac disease was 18 out of 233, or 7.7%. The doctors concluded that these results confirm that celiac disease is prevalent in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

The doctors say the study reinforces the importance of celiac screening for children with type 1 diabetes, and also the advisability of keeping an eye on tTg serology as part of determining the effects of and compliance to a gluten-free diet.

Participating Facilities
1. Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology at British Columbias Childrens Hospital Vancouver, British Columbia.
2. Division of Endocrinology, British Columbias Childrens Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia.
3. Division of Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia

Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition: Volume 29(4)October 1999p 495.

About the Author: Jefferson Adams is a freelance health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Abdel Moniem Abdel Hai
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 Dec 2008 4:59:30 AM PDT
I'm a researcher (prevalence of celiac disease among type 1 diabetes in Sudan)




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Thanks for your reply. I will get her retested. She hasn't had any gluten for a year and is very good at not eating it, but had some cake that night. It's so hard because the Dr who did the biopsy said there wasn't any damage so she can't be classed as Coeliacs. She had ten samples taken, but yes, like you say the intestines are huge.

Thank you for your informative reply. Yes I think you are right in that she is still getting dome cross contamination exposure through chopping boards, condiments etc. I will get her bloods redone to see if her levels have dropped and do a gluten challenge again. We all are on a whole foods diet, buy not all Gluten-Free. I find extended family difficult as because she had a negative biopsy they don't believe she could still possibly have it and aren't so careful with her. Thank you for the links, all very helpful.

I don't know if there is a simple answer to your question but I try to use "choose my plate" as a guide for my meals. https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate It basically suggests that when you sit down to a meal - 1/2 of your plate is fruits and veggies and the other 1/2 is dairy, carbs and protein. It's a really simple way to look at my meals and see if they are balanced enough. It also suggests getting very few calories in liquid form and avoiding snacking..... Good luck!

I use Swirve Sweetener, Pyure , Xlear brand Xylitol, and for a mayo sub I use Walden Farms, There was a avocado oil based one I use sometimes forgot the name. >.> I can not have sugars due to UC. But I might suggest using Big Tree Coconut Sugar for a deep rich low glycemic sugar. I still use them in my bakery. I will admit some stuff with dextrose, etc. bothers me....funny how it is only some brands and not others. Yet they can both be gluten-free, I think it might have something to do with the processing method and me reacting to something else in it.

I use any sugar. Never found one to be " unsafe".