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New Method of Diagnosing Celiac Disease Looks Promising

Celiac.com 07/30/2007 - A study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology suggests that a newly proposed system of classifying duodenal pathology on celiac disease provides an improved inter-observation than the less Marsh-Oberhuber classification, and offers an advance towards making a simpler, better, more valid diagnosis of celiac disease.

Celiac disease is presently classified according to the Marsh-Oberhuber system of classifying duodenal lesions.

Recently, a more elementary method has been suggested. That method is based on three villous morphologies—non-atrophic, atrophic with villous crypto ratio <3:1, and atrophic, villi idnetectable—combined with intraepithelial counts of >25/100 enterocytes.

The study team chose a group of sixty people to be part of the study. Of the 60 patients the team studied, 46 were female and 14 were male. The average age was 28.2 years with a mean range of 1-78 years. 10 people had celiac disease, 13 had celiac disease with normal villi, but a pathological increase in epithelial lymphocytes >25/100 & hyperplastic crypts. 37 patients had celiac disease with villous aptrophy.

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Patients were given biopsies, with at least 4 biopsies were taken from the second part of the duodenum. Biopsies were fixed in formalin and processed according to standard procedures, with cuts at six levels, and stained with hematoxylin resin. The slides were sent randomly to 6 pathologists who were blind to one another.

The results showed that this new method of classification yielded better inter-observer agreement and more accurate diagnosis that the more difficult Marsh-Oberhuber system.

Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2007;5:838–843

health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

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1 Response:

 
Val Havrilla
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Jan 2009 5:41:53 PM PDT
I am sure I have celiac disease and I was told by a friend there are four blood tests which can be done to properly diagnose it.




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raven, thought of you when i read this post. it is important that we all remember that DQ 2+8 DO NOT cover ALL celiacs, and probably less than is actually claimed.

your doc sounds like a keeper.

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I'm not sure that this is the original study I looked at, but it does describe the different antibodies found circulating in the blood that is specific to DH (anti-eTG, which is analogous to anti-tTG in regular celiac disease). At any rate, it seems that they can test for it, but many labs do not...

Welcome. You might consider staying on gluten and seeing your doctor for a celiac blood test panel. You need to be consuming gluten for several weeks prior to the blood draw otherwise the tests can be invalid. You could have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity. The only way to know for ...