No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Cause of Celiac Disease Found to be Mostly Genetic

Gut 2002;50:624-628

Celiac.com 05/02/2002 – Results of the first large population-based twin study of celiac disease were recently published in the April edition of the journal Gut. The study was conducted by Professor L Greco and colleagues at the UniversitĂ di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Pediatria. The study compared identical twins (genetically identical) to fraternal twins (genetically not identical) who share only the same number of genes as non-twin siblings. This methodology allowed the researchers to determine what role a shared environment plays in the onset of celiac disease in comparison to a genetic role.

Ads by Google:

The researchers matched the Italian Twin Registry with the membership lists of a patient support group for celiacs. Forty seven twin pairs were found and screened for antiendomysial (EMA) and antihuman-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies. Identical twins were verified using DNA fingerprinting and fraternal twins were typed for HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 molecules.

Their results indicate that 38% of the combined twin pairs showed signs of celiac disease, which breaks down to 75% of the identical twin pairs and 11% of the non-identical twin pairs. Additionally, females who had a twin with celiac disease were 30% more likely to develop it themselves, in comparison to an unaffected male twin. Further, the results of the study indicate that environmental factors have little or no effect on the acquisition of celiac disease, and that there is substantial evidence of a very strong genetic component that is only partially related to the HLA region. The researchers suggest that several genes work collectively to cause celiac disease, and a single missing or altered gene is probably not its cause.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


There are plenty of people that have gone gluten free without the official diagnosis because a gluten challenge would make them too sick. I think you are the only one that will know if it's right for you. There are some benefits to getting diagnosed as either celiac or NCGS. 1. If you are...

Oh, I would hate to have you test negative because your gluten challenge was not long enough. http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-is-a-gluten-challenge/ https://www.beyondceliac.org/celiac-disease/Testing-and-Diagnosis/The-Gluten-Challenge/1510/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/p...

thank you guys. I'm hoping the Gi will call back tomorrow. I'm getting the kitchen totally gluten free, except for a few things my sister who is a bit disabled is going to have. But no bread, flour, pasta and most other things will not have gluten. And my daughter doesn't go to school, she d...

Unprocessed food is great, but a life without chocolate no way! Am sure you will find a suitable brand. I don't eat Lindt, think they may use barley, others may know more. The Moser Roth are Aldi own brand. Looks like Aldi aren't in CR so not an alternative for you sorry. Maybe chec...

Ok guys, I'm not an expert. Maybe it was really just cc as Matt said. Or my body is just too sensitive now and this thing is too artificial/chemical. I feel that real unprocessed food is better for me now. It won't be a problem to find another brand. The Moser Roth doesn't sound familiar t...