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Aunt Connie's Meatballs and Italian Gravy (Gluten-Free Pasta Sauce)

This recipe comes to us from Arthur Spiegel.

Ingredients:
1 pound ground turkey
1 pound ground beef or pork
1 egg per pound of ground meat (for this recipe, 2 eggs)
Garlic powder, to taste (about a tablespoon, more or less)
Salt to taste
Fresh Ground Black Pepper to taste
½ cup gluten-free bread crumbs or use a few tablespoons of rice flour or potato flour.
1- 2 Teaspoons Oregano Flakes to taste

Directions:
With your hands, combine wet and dry ingredients, thoroughly. Form meatballs about golf ball size. Lightly fry tem in extra virgin olive oil until brown all over. Finish cooking in red Italian gravy. This is best if you can cook one day in advance and let the meatballs sit in the gravy over night. Serve hot.

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Italian Gravy

Ingredients:
5 to 10 cloves of fresh minced garlic
1 large onion, minced
1 red pepper chopped
½ pound chopped mushrooms
½ to 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
Salt to taste
Fresh Ground Black Pepper to taste
Good sized sprig of fresh Basil chopped
1 pound sweet Italian or spicy Italian Sausage (pork or turkey is fine) cut up into 1 inch pieces
1 pound of ground turkey
1 large can crushed tomatoes
1 large can tomato puree
1 small can tomato paste
2 tablespoons of sugar
1 cup of your favorite red wine

Directions:
Finely mince garlic, and chop onion. In a large sauce pot, start to fry in extra virgin olive oil until onions are translucent and starting to brown. Don't let the garlic burn, or it will be bitter. Add in chopped red pepper and chopped mushrooms. Add salt and black pepper to taste. Saute. Remove veggies from heat and set aside. In same pan, brown the sausages. Remove from heat and drain fat. Brown ground turkey, adding salt and pepper to taste. Pour in some red wine to deglaze the pan and get up the brown bits on the bottom. Return the sausage meat and veggies and add some salt and pepper. Add crushed tomatoes, tomato puree and tomato paste. Add rest of red wine, basil and sugar to taste. (The longer you have to let this cook, the less sugar you'll need, as basil will sweeten the gravy. If you have less time to cook, use more sugar to taste.). Stir gravy mixture well. Add in the meatballs. Cover and let cook on a low heat. Stir occasionally, so nothing sticks to the bottom of the pot. During the cooking process, taste from time to time and add seasoning as desired. Some people like their gravy spicier than others.

This is terrific red gravy for spaghetti or any other pasta.

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2 Responses:

 
Jude
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said this on
24 Oct 2007 7:53:04 AM PDT
This sight has been a lifesaver for me. I was just diagnosed March 2006 and as this helped to kill my mother I have been struggling. I paid for some other sights and they are not nearly as helpful or as informative as yours.
Thank you.

 
Marilyn Barto
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
25 Oct 2007 7:43:21 AM PDT
I'm new to the celiac disease problem, and appreciate recipes. Knowing I can use rice flour in place of the bread crumbs I use in my meatballs is very helpful.




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Ditto. However, this is what I can never understand about gluten free food. (see the bold bits which I've taken from the article) "We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more,? I wonder why what so much of what I eat that's gluten free doesn't have added vitamins - we of all people need fortification in our cereals and bread, surely?

Yeah we learned that the hard way. I am inclined to think (as I did initially) that it was JUST the Cheerios but as time is passing and she is not bouncing back I am worried that we need to strip away dairy again for a while.

Oh I have no issue with being dairy free personally but tell that to a 13 year old. We both went gluten-free at the same time and it has been mindlessly easy for me. But I am easy about food and no real food issues. I am far more adaptable. She comes to the table with her own unique set of issues that complicate just easily transitioning to dairy free versions of much loved favorites. To most they are jst that "substitutes" to her they are completely different foods and ones that she has no interest in eating. They don't satisfy her need for XYZ. It is like craving an apple and someone handing you a fish. For her anyway! LOL!

I believe the talk around this forum is that cheerios are not gluten free enough for people with celiac at this time. I don't know if anything has changed on that and when their lawyer calls me I'll quickly delete this. haha

Could be we generally say get off of dairy for a few months when going gluten free. The part of the intestines that produce the enzymes, and help break down dairy are associated with the tips of the villi, which are the most damaged if not gone in celiacs. THIS is why most of us end up with a lactose intolerance early on. And most can introduce it later after healing. As to her symptoms with it there was a bunch of research about dairy permeated the gut and causing neurological issues in a autism study I was looking at years ago. And there have been other studies about damaged intestines and how the hormones in milk can easier effect ones body. Personally I also have a huge grudge against dairy on a personal level as it is not natural to suck on a cows tits and drink the stuff, nor your dogs, nor a rabbits......I mean come on even Human Breast milk you would find odd to drink as an adult right? Back in the past dairy was a great way to get calories and fats when there was famine, etc around I mean it is meant to make a calf grow into a 500+lb cow. But on a genetic and hormonal level it is not really for human consumption and now days the whole corporate BS propaganda push and dairy farms shove that oh its healthy stuff down your throat. There are plenty of dairy free options for everything feel free to message me if you need help finding anything I have been dairy free for over a decade.