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Quick Thai Panang Curry (Gluten-Free)

This is a fun, lively gluten-free recipe suitable for family or friends, or even entertaining a crowd.  It's especially nice to make in the early to mid summer when fresh green beans are in season.

Put Thai jasmine rice or Basmati rice onto cook in rice cooker or stove top.

Panang Curry Paste Ingredients:
1/3 cup dried red chilis (California chilis are fine), soaked until soft, seeds removed
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons diced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon toasted cumin seeds
2 tablespoons each diced garlic & shallots
1 tablespoon roasted peanuts (or almonds)
1 teaspoon shrimp paste or dried shrimp (Mojave brand – contains sulfites)
2 tablespoons cashew-macadamia nut butter, almond butter or peanut butter
1 teaspoon grated lime peel
1 tablespoon dark agave syrup or dark brown sugar
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
2 Tablespoons chopped lemon grass (optional)

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Place all ingredients in food processor and pulse to combine, then run for a few minutes until a fine paste forms.  Let paste rest at room temperature for all flavors to combine, while assembling remaining ingredients.

Pangang Curry Ingredients:
1 tablespoon canola or peanut oil + 1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 cups sliced chicken tenders or boneless skinless chicken breast or
2 cups sliced beef (a tender cut for stir-frying)
1 cup sliced button mushrooms
2 cups sliced fresh green beans
(optional – ½ red pepper, or 1 carrot sliced)
2 tablespoons fish sauce (Thai Kitchen brand has a good g.f. one)
½ cup coconut milk
1 cup chicken broth (I use Pacific Foods brand, which has a good clean taste)
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
½ cup chopped Thai Basil
Juice of ½ lime

Cooking Directions:
Sauté Panang curry paste in oil for at least two minutes to allow flavor of spices to develop.  Add chopped chicken and combine with paste, sautéing on medium-high heat until chicken begins to cook, then add green beans and mushrooms, continuing to sauté over medium-high heat until vegetables begin to become tender.  Add 1 cup chicken broth and cook a few more minutes, then add fish sauce, lime juice, and herbs.  Sauté for a few more minutes.  Add coconut milk and reduce heat to low while adjusting seasonings.  Serve over rice.

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1 Response:

 
Gloria Brown
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
03 May 2009 6:30:15 AM PDT
Thai recipes make for excellent potentially gluten-free cuisine. If completely fresh ingredients are used, rather than trusting others to manufacture uncontaminated products, when you know how difficult doing so yourself is, delicious and safe meals are possible. (To get around packaged products, buy nuts in bulk, rinse thoroughly, soak, and roast or press yourself; make your own broths from meats you know are gluten-free; if you do not press your own oil, lightly steam foods rather than sauté; grow your own spices–or purchase in bulk as whole as possible and thoroughly rinse before seasoning your meals.)




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Even one positive can be diagnostic. This is one: Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9. If unsure, a biopsy of the small intestine will provide definite confirmation. There is a control test to validate the other ones, but I don't see it there. What is does is validate the others by checking on the overall antibody levels. But it is to detect possible false negatives. A positive is a positive. I think your daughter has joined our club.

My daughter, almost 7 years old, recently had a lot of blood work done, her Dr is out of the office, but another Dr in the practice said everything looked normal. I'm waiting for her Dr to come back and see what she thinks. I'm concerned because there is one abnormal result and I can't find info to tell me if just that one test being abnormal means anything. The reason for the blood work is mainly because of her poor growth, though she does have some other symptoms. IgA 133 mg/dl Reference range 33-200 CRP <2.9 same as reference range Gliadin Deamidated Peptide IgA .4 Reference range <=14.9 Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9 Reference range <=14.9 TTG IgA .5 Reference range <=14.9 TTG IgG <.8 Reference range <=14.9

Just watch out. I just went to the expo in Schaumburg, IL, and ended up getting glutened. I realized afterward that I ate all these samples thinking they were gluten free, and they weren't. One company was advertising some sugar, and had made some cake, but then I realized.... How do I know if this contains any other ingredients that might have gluten? Did they make it with a blender or utensils that had gluten contamination? Makes me realize the only safe things would be packaged giveaways with gluten free labeling. My fault for not thinking things through. It was just too exciting thinking i could try it all and enjoy without worry.

No fasting required for a celiac blood test unless they were checking your blood glucose levels during the same blood draw.

I wish! I got the flu this winter as well as a couple of colds. I do have 3 lids, the youngest in preschool, so there's always a lot of germs around. Lol