No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Elderly Show more Celiac Disease, Vague Symptoms, Rising Rates

Celiac.com 07/24/2009 - Celiac disease is a common disorder affecting more than one percent of the population in the Western world. The condition is often assumed to affect children and young adults, and traditional celiac disease research has focused on the development of the disease in in those populations, and on the basic mechanisms at play over the lifetime of the disease.

However, researchers recently showed a high number of both diagnosed and undetected celiac disease cases among elderly people. Currently, scientists know very little about the appearance of celiac disease in elderly people.

A team of researchers based in Finland recently set out to examine the increasing prevalence and high incidence of celiac disease among the elderly. The research team was made up of Anitta Vilppula, Katri Kaukinen, Liisa Luostarinen, Ilkka Krekelä, Heikki Patrikainen, Raisa Valve, Markku Mäki and Pekka Collin.

The team evaluated the prevalence of celiac disease in people over 55 years of age, and assessed the incidence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (CDb) and celiac disease including seropositive subjects for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (CDb+s).

The team based their study on celiac disease prevalence figures in 2815 randomly selected subjects who had undergone a clinical examination and serologic screening for celiac disease in 2002.

Ads by Google:

A second screening in the same population was carried out in 2005, comprising now 2216 individuals. The team confirmed positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies results with small bowel biopsy.

Over a three year period, the prevalence of CDb increased from 2.13 to 2.34%, and that of CDb+s from 2.45 to 2.70%. 

Five new cases emerged from five previously seronegative patients; two showed minor abdominal symptoms and three were asymptomatic. Celiac disease incidence in 2002–2005 was 0.23%, for an annual incidence of 0.08%.

It's unclear whether the number of undetected cases in the elderly is due to diagnostic delay, or to the development of celiac disease at a more advanced age, or both.

In closing, elderly people showed higher rates of celiac disease, but with subtle symptoms. Repeated screening detected five biopsy-proven cases in three years, indicating that the disorder may arise late, even among the elderly. The researchers are therefor recommending that doctors treating elderly patients employ an increased alertness as to the possible presence of celiac disease.

BMC Gastroenterology 2009, 9:49

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



1 Response:

 
lance Wingfield
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
02 Aug 2009 9:19:02 AM PDT
Excellent/informative article. I was diagnosed at age 61 via blood test. Symptoms included indigestion following ingestion of wheat products. Subsequent bone density test also indicated bone loss - all reversed by stringent adherence to gluten free diet / Fosamax tablets




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


The full celiac panel includes: TTG IGA TTG IGG DGP IGA DGP IGG EMA IGA You can either have a gastroenterologist order the full celiac panel plus whatever else they typically test for, or you can order your own test at a site like walkinlab.com. At walkin...

You could certainly try. Just remember that, if the mix doesn't have xanthum gum, you may need a little.

Maybe the 20 mg. was too strong for you and increasing symptoms? I have a very low threshold for most meds, and do better on child sized doses. If you tolerate the 10 mg., that may be the way to go just to get symptoms under control and get stabilized. Or maybe 10 mg. every other day, if tha...

I am sorry that you are all having to go through this. I know all too well the neuro issues she is going through. The world seems so hopeless under that gluten cloud. But it does lift. There isn't much a neurologist is going to be able to do except to encourage her to be as strict as possible. ...

Reviving this thread as I am in search of better care for my child, diagnosed this spring with off the charts antibodies. She experiences significant mood effects from gluten and all I get from her GI and ped are blank looks - they aren't familiar with the idea that it can affect one's mental or ...