21904 Gluten-Free Challah (Dairy-Free Option) - Celiac.com
No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gluten-Free Challah (Dairy-Free Option)

Although associated with important Jewish holidays like Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year), challah is not only a culturally significant bread at these times of year, but also a delicious and impressive bread to serve at your table any time.

No matter what your reason for making this delicious bread, celebrate that this quick, easy (yes, I said easy!) and very impressive recipe is at your gluten-free fingertips any time you feel like looking forward to a sweeter day.

All of you who have seen me at gluten-free cooking classes or demonstrations making yeast breads already know the dirty little secret about gluten-free bread. Shhhh.... don't tell the gluten-eaters! Seriously! It is super quick and shockingly easy to make homemade gluten-free bread! Impress your friends and shock the neighbors with this recipe too: not only is GF challah delicious and super fast, it's almost too beautiful to eat!

Gluten-Free ChallahIngredients:
1/3 cup warm water
1 package rapid rise gf yeast
1 tsp. granulated cane sugar
1 cup vanilla dairy or non-dairy (soy or coconut yogurt) at room temperature
1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
5 large egg yolks at room temperature (slightly mixed)
1/3 cup canola oil
4 Tbs. honey, agave nectar or molasses
4 cups Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour*
3 Tbs. + 2 tsp. granulated cane sugar
1 ¼ tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. gluten-free baking powder
1 large egg, mixed
Poppy seeds, sesame seeds, raisins, or other topping or mix-in (optional)

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 200 F, then turn it off; if you have a warming drawer, you may set that to low/moist setting instead. Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper.

Ads by Google:

Bread Machine Method:
Pour all the liquid ingredients into a bread machine set to "Dough" setting. Next add the sugar and honey and then the remaining dry ingredients, save the yeast. Make a well in the top of the dry ingredients and pour the yeast into the center. Close the lid and start the dough cycle. (If you choose to add raisins to the batter, add them during this cycle, after all the other ingredients have been mixed together). Watch to see that the dry ingredients are fully integrated; if they are not completely mixing in, go around the inside of the pan with a rubber spatula to aid in the mixing process. When the mixing portion of the cycle ends, you may remove the dough (don't wait for the gluten “dough” cycle to finish, as it will let the dough sit for 1 or 2 hours after mixing – this is not what you want for this gluten-free dough!).

Stand Mixer Method:
In a small bowl, mix together the warm water, yeast and 1 teaspoon of sugar to proof the yeast; set aside. In the bowl of your stand mixer, add the remaining wet ingredients and mix until combined. Whisk together the dry ingredients in a separate bowl. After 5 minutes of proofing, stir in the yeast-water mixture into the wet ingredients (note: if your yeast isn't bubbling at this point, throw it out and start again with fresh yeast). Gradually stir in the dry ingredients until fully integrated, then mix 2 minutes more on medium speed.

Using either method, once the dough is combined, divide it in half and divide each half into three equally-sized balls. Roll each ball out into a coil or long log on a clean, flat surface dusted lightly with Jules Gluten Free™ All Purpose Flour. Pinch together one end of each coil, wetting them slightly with water to help them join together at the top, then braid them, finishing by connecting them to the top of the other end in order to form a crown, or circular shape. You will then have one round challah loaf. Gently transfer it to the parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat for the second set of three balls. In the alternative, you can simply divide the dough in half, roll out into a flattened coil, then twist upon itself and join at the ends to form a circular loaf; repeat with the other half of the dough ball.

In a small bowl, mix the extra egg together and brush over each loaf well, coating the entire top surface. Sprinkle the seeds or any toppings at this point, then place the tray (covering the loaves with wax paper sprayed with cooking oil) in a warming drawer set to low heat, or into the preheated oven for approximately 20 - 30 minutes. (Don't expect the bread to rise much at this stage).

Once risen slightly, place the uncovered tray in an oven preheated to 350 F (static) or 325 F (convection) for 20-25 minutes. Remove to cool on a wire rack and cut after slightly cooled.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



5 Responses:

 
cka1923
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Nov 2009 10:43:11 AM PDT
Wow, so glad I can still have great Challah! Awesome recipe.

 
Lindsey
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
03 Jan 2010 3:38:28 PM PDT
I would REALLY like to make this, but have an egg allergy. Would you suggest a substitute or would it not turn out? Thank you so much!

 
Jaton
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
25 Aug 2011 7:06:17 PM PDT
I'd also like to know about the egg replacement, please.

 
Marilyn
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
28 Jun 2012 1:56:00 PM PDT
I too would like to know about the egg replacement... does it work?

 
LzBeth
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Dec 2013 7:26:05 PM PDT
Need a recipe with over 55% oat flour for truly Kosher recipe as oats are the only Biblical grain that is truly gluten free.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hello and welcome Maybe? From reading others accounts there's a big variation in how quickly gluten antibodies respond to the gluten diet. I did similar to you and my doctor said that 1 week back on should be enough to show up in a test, but he didn't know what he was talking about sadly... The 2 week figure refers to the endoscopy, for blood testing 8-12 weeks on gluten is more normal. Basically if it comes back positive fine you have your answer. If its negative it may be a false negative due to your going gluten free beforehand. If you want to pursue a diagnosis then yes. Don't go off gluten again until you confirm that all testing is complete. Keep a journal noting any symptoms, that may be useful to you later. More info here: There's some good info in the site faq: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ I know how you feel! Partway through my gluten challenge I knew that too results notwithstanding. Fwiw I think you've found your answer. Good luck!

Learn more about testing for celiac disease here: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ You do have to be on a gluten diet for ANY of the celiac tests (blood and biopsy) to work. While the endoscopy (with biopsies) can reveal villi damage, many other things besides celiac disease can cause villi damage too: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-else-can-cause-damage-to-the-small-intestine-other-than-celiac-disease/ So, both the blood test and endoscopy are usually ordered. There are some exceptions, but those are not common.

Exactly what are your allergy symptoms? Were they IgG or IgE? Allergy testing as a whole is not super accurate -- especially the IgG. Were you on any H1 or H2 antihistamines for the last five days when you were tested? As far as celiac testing, four days without consuming gluten probably would not impact testing.

I've been seeing my dr for a few weeks now about my stomach issues. We've ruled out the gallbladder and h-pylori and today I had the celiac blood tests done. From the reading I've done the past two days, it seems to me that it's highly likely that I have it. I've had digestive issues for years, but they've gotten progressively worse over the past 6 months or so. Pain and nausea when eating, bloat, eternal constipation, dh rash, at it's worse, tight cramp-like pain in a fist under my sternum, radiating through my back and around my right side keeping me up at night. Also heartburn/reflux and trouble swallowing, etc. Anyway, about 2 months ago, I needed a change. I didn't go to the dr immediately because it seemed pointless. (I've mentioned stomach ache when eating to drs before and been blown off.) So, I started the Whole30 elimination diet (takes out soy, grains, dairy, peanuts, and leaves you basically eating meat & veggies). Figured it would show me what I needed to take out of my diet and hopefully feel better. It worked- I felt great! And it seems that grains and gluten are my biggest offenders. But, now I've been off gluten prior to celiac testing. It's been 7 weeks. After 4 weeks I tested steal cut oats, that I later found out were probably glutened. And then nothing until yesterday. Yesterday I had 2 pieces of bread and a muffin and today I had two pieces of bread and then the blood test. Is this going to be enough to show up on the tests? My dr said that it would probably show up, since I had some yesterday and today and was currently having symptoms. But, google seems to say that I should be glutened for 2 wks straight before testing. Has anyone tested positive after just a little gluten? If it's negative should I insist on doing it again after weeks back on gluten? I feel awful, but do want clear answers. Obviously, gluten's not going to be a part of my life any more either way.

So just to clarify had not consumed any gluten for about 4 days before testing. I was assured by my allergist that it wouldn't affect the test. But what was alarming was that she retested my food allergies (my most recent reaction was two weeks ago) and every food allergy I have came back negative. I don't understand how that is possible. These food allergies developed when I was 20 and I am almost 24 now.