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Polymeric Binders Block Gliadin-induced Intestinal Cell Toxicity

Celiac.com 10/16/2009 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the ability of a polymeric binder to reverse the toxic effects induced by gliadin in human intestinal cells and gliadin-sensitive HCD4-DQ8 mice. The team was made up of Maud Pinier, Elena F. Verdu, Mohamad Nasser–Eddine, Chella S. David, Anne Vézina, Nathalie Rivard, and Jean–Christophe Leroux.

The team neutralized gliadin through complexation to a linear copolymer of hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and sodium 4-styrene sulfonate (SS). They then examined the ability of the polymeric binder to mitigate the damaging effect of gliadin on cell-cell contact in IEC-6, Caco-2/15, and primary cultured differentiated enterocytes.

They used gliadin-sensitive HLA-HCD4/DQ8 transgenic mice to measure the effectiveness of the polymeric binder in averting gliadin-triggered intestinal barrier dysfunction.  They found that Poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate-co-styrene sulfonate) [P(HEMA-co-SS)] complexed with gliadin in a fairly precise manner.

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Exposing intestinal cells to gliadin caused major changes in both cell structure and cell to cell contacts. By complexing the gliadin with P(HEMA-co-SS) the researchers were able to prevent these undesirable changes. More importantly, the P(HEMA-co-SS) inhibited gliadin digestion by gastrointestinal enzymes, which minimized the development of peptides that trigger immune adverse immune reactions.

By co-administering P(HEMA-co-SS) with gliadin to HLA-HCD4/DQ8 mice, researchers were able to eliminate gliadin-triggered changes in the gut barrier and lower intraepithelial lymphocyte and macrophage cell counts.

From these results, the team concludes that polymeric binders can prevent in vitro gliadin-induced epithelial toxicity and intestinal barrier dysfunction in HCD4/DQ8 mice. Such polymeric binders might play a significant role in the treating people with gluten-induced disorders.

Source:
GASTROENTEROLOGY 2009;136:288–298

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2 Responses:

 
Hallie
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said this on
16 Oct 2009 4:19:45 PM PDT
Wouldn't an experiment in mice like this one be considered "in vivo," rather than, "in vitro?"

 
Maggie
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said this on
31 Jan 2010 12:54:17 PM PDT
Very interesting article. Sign me up if they would like a live person who is gluten intolerant to test this on.




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Make sure that you ask the doctor how long she has to stop the supplements before you have her levels tested and be sure to take them all with you when you have the appointment so the doctor knows what she is taking.

Talk to your doctor. With your family history and symptoms he/she may be able to diagnose based on resolution of your symptoms and family history. Also check with your local hospital if it has it's own lab. Mine covered any labs at a greatly reduced cost based on a sliding fee scale. Did you have an MRI before they did the spinal? Celiacs with neuro impact will have white spots on an MRI that resemble the lesions found with MS. Many neuro doctors don't know this. I went through what you did and they did a spinal on me also based on the MRI results. If my doctor had know what the UBOs (unidentified bright objects) were I would have been diagnosed a couple years sooner than I was. Make sure if you supplement that you ask your doctor which ones you need to stop taking and for how long before they do a blood test to check levels. Sublingual B12 is a good idea when we have nervous system issues, but needs to be stopped for at least a week for an accurate blood level on testing. I hope you get some answers and feel better soon.

Thanks for that. Will get her tested for deficiencies. I did take her to a naturopath and get her on a bunch of vitamins, but she never was tested via bloods, so will get on to that, thanks

Hi Could a mod please move this post: and my reply below to a new thread when they get a chance? Thanks! Matt

Hello and welcome Firstly, don't worry about it but for ease your post (and hopefully my reply) will probably be moved to its own thread. That will make it easier for others to see it and reply and also help Galaxy's own thread here on track and making sense. The antibodies that the celiac tests look for can drop very quickly, so... maybe? Celiac is difficult to test for, there are different tests and sometimes someone doesnt test on one but does on the other. If you can get a copy of the tests and post it here the community may be able to help explain the results. It may have shown damage to the villi, the little tendrils in your intestine that help you extract nutrients from your food. Celiac is one, but not the only, way in which they can get damaged leading to a vast number of potential symptoms and further making diagnosis a tricky proposition. Definitely, there's a connection. Here's a page that explains it in detail: https://stomachachefree.wordpress.com/2012/03/21/liver-disease-in-celiacs/ Fantastic It sounds as if your doctors were happy to diagnose you on the basis of the endoscopy? It may be then that you've found your answer. I hope so, you've clearly had a rotten and very scary time. I'm sure with the positive reaction to the diet you want to go on and get healthy, but I would only add that you should discuss this with your doctors, because they may want to exclude other potential causes if they've not confirmed celiac at this point. Check out the advice for newly diagnosed here: To your family I'd simply say that celiac is a disease of the autoimmune system, the part of our body that fights diseases and keeps us safe. In celiac people the autoimmune system see's the gluten protein found in wheat, barley, or rye grains as a threat to the system and it produces antibodies to attack it and in doing so attacks it's own body as well. It's genetic in component so close family members should consider a test if they have any of the many symptoms. There's roughly 1 person in 100 with celiac but most of them don't know it and are risking getting or staying sick by not finding out. There's further info for them and you here: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ I'm going to ask a mod to move your post and my reply to a new thread, but wanted to give you an answer first The good news is you've found a great site and there will be lots of support for you here. You've also got 'lucky' in that if you're going to have an autoimmune condition, celiac is a good one Most react really well to the gluten free diet and you will hopefully have much more healing to come! Best wishes Matt