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Gluten-Free Dining

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - I recently embarked on a quest for family-friendly restaurants that offered gluten-free selections.  I explained this vision to my husband and three children as we set the rules of our experiment: five family members to eat at five restaurants during a five week period.  The challenge - the children were to choose the restaurant, the chosen restaurant couldn’t sell Happy Meals or have a drive-thru window and the restaurant had to be a franchise rather than a local venue.  Additionally, the mom, me, and the only celiac in the family, had the option of not eating if it might compromise her small intestines.  Here is what we discovered:

Restaurant # 1: Applebee’s
My children chose to eat at Applebee’s on a Sunday afternoon for lunch.  The atmosphere was friendly and a plentiful kids’ menu was offered.  With over 1900 restaurants nationwide and in 15 other countries, according to the company website, it seems there is an Applebee’s almost everywhere.  Additionally, Applebee’s offers a Weight Watcher’s menu for restaurant patrons who are counting points, which led me to hope an allergy/gluten-free menu would also be provided.

After we were seated, I perused the menu to read this statement, “To our guests with food sensitivities or allergies.  Applebee’s cannot ensure that menu items do not contain ingredients that might cause an allergic reaction.  Please consider this when ordering.”

I spoke to a manager and asked if a gluten-free menu was available.  I was informed, “Applebee’s policy is not to guarantee allergy-free food.  Our company does not carry a gluten-free menu, but we can modify food.  For example, we can prepare grilled chicken breast strips for kids, rather than giving them breaded chicken fingers.  Again, we don’t guarantee the food will not come in contact with the allergen.”

Restaurant #2: Red Robin
The next stop on our restaurant expedition was Red Robin, which also offers an extensive children’s menu.  According to the company website, there are over 430 Red Robin restaurants, in North America.  After we were seated in our booth, I asked our server if a gluten-free menu was available.  She immediately went to the kitchen and returned with a printed Wheat/Gluten Allergen menu.  Printed on the top of the menu was the statement, “Red Robin relied on our suppliers’ statements of ingredients in deciding which products did not contain certain allergens.  Suppliers may change the ingredients in their products or the way they prepare their products, so please check this list to make sure that the menu item you like still meets your dietary requirements.  Red Robin cannot guarantee that any menu item will be prepared completely free of the allergen in question.”

Gluten-free offerings were grouped in the following categories: salads; salad dressings; burgers; chicken burgers; entrees; and available side dishes.  The Kids’ menu offered a beef patty burger, turkey patty, and chicken-on-a-stick.  It stated: “Kids may also select from any items listed on the Wheat/Gluten menu as adult items to custom design a wheat/gluten free meal for your child.  This menu is current and valid until 10/1/09.”

I was informed by our server that when a customer orders from the gluten-free menu, an allergy alert is put on their ticket and the area of food preparation is cleaned to avoid cross-contamination.  Additionally, the fries are prepared in oil specifically designated for fries, and those with a gluten allergy should avoid the fry seasoning.

I ordered off of the Red Robin gluten-free menu and personally recommend the Crispy Chicken Tender Salad with grilled chicken rather than crispy, no garlic bread, and the honey mustard dressing.

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Restaurant #3: Garlic Jim’s Famous Gourmet Pizza
It was a Friday evening and my children decided they really wanted to eat pizza for dinner.  This led us to almost break our fast food rule by ordering carryout from a pizza restaurant.  Ordering pizza is an extreme challenge for those suffering from gluten intolerance. Therefore, I had to do my research ahead of time.  I called Papa John’s, Domino’s, Papa Murphy’s and Pizza Hut to confirm that gluten-free pizza is not offered, at any of these pizza chains.  I did find a pizza franchise in my state, called Garlic Jim’s, which offers a gluten-free crust. 

According to the chain website, “Garlic Jim’s is proud to be the first pizza chain accredited for gluten free food service by the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America.”  Garlic Jim’s Famous Gourmet Pizza is currently located in seven states including; Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Colorado, Tennessee, and Florida.

I was informed at the restaurant that the gluten-free crust is covered with sauce in a separate area in order to avoid cross contamination although the toppings are put on in the same location where wheat-based crusts are prepared.  Different pans and utensils are used in the preparation of this gluten-free thin crust which costs three dollars more than their traditional pizzas.  The restaurant also posts a sign stating that although they do offer gluten-free pizza, they cannot guarantee the pizza will not come in contact with allergens.

I recommend the gluten-free pepperoni pizza, and can attest that pizza has never tasted so good.

Restaurant #4:  The Old Spaghetti Factory
The Old Spaghetti Factory was established in 1969, and as of today, boasts 39 locations nationwide.  I was quite pleased to discover, when my children chose to eat at The Old Spaghetti Factory, that they offer gluten-free pasta.  Before being seated, I inquired at the hostess desk if a gluten-free menu was available and I was presented with a laminated copy. 

Each entré includes complimentary salad, bread, and ice cream. Obviously, those with gluten intolerance need to give the bread a pass, but there are viable options available for the remainder of the meal.  Gluten-free salad dressings include pesto and vinaigrette—hold the croutons on the salad.  The main course is a rice pasta with the following sauce choices: marinara; meat; mushroom; mizithra cheese, and; brown butter.  Diners also have the option of adding gluten-free sausage and sliced chicken breast to their meal.  For dessert, a choice of spumoni or vanilla ice cream is offered. 

 I ordered the Manager’s Favorite pasta, which includes a combination of two sauces.  I chose gluten-free pasta topped with marinara sauce and mizithra cheese.  My dinner also included a salad with vinaigrette dressing and spumoni for dessert. 

Restaurant #5: Outback Steakhouse
Our final dining choice was the Outback Steakhouse which, according to the company’s website, is an Australian Steakhouse with over 950 locations worldwide.  I was offered a gluten-free menu that is nearly as large as the main menu.  Offerings included appetizers, steaks, chicken, seafood, salads, side dishes, and even a brownie dessert.  The entire gluten-free menu is available on the Outback Steakhouse website, www.outback.com .

Our server was very knowledgeable of gluten intolerance. I ordered off of the gluten-free menu.  When ordering salads, it is recommended that you request that they be mixed separately to avoid cross contamination.  Overall, it was a very pleasant dining experience for my entire family, with a plentiful menu for me and an ample kids’ menu.

I would certainly recommend what I ordered— Victoria’s Filet with a baked potato and a salad without croutons.  I passed on the bread which accompanies every meal.  It was a pleasant dining experience at what is quite possibly the restaurant that has set the current gold standard for gluten-free dining.

Overall, our experiment was a great success with four of the five restaurants we visited offering gluten-free menus.  I advise diners to be cautious wherever they eat because even if a company offers gluten-free options you must also take into account the knowledge of the chef preparing your food and the server assisting you.  It is encouraging that major restaurant chains are acknowledging the need to modify their menus for those suffering from gluten intolerance.  Good luck and happy dining.

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12 Responses:

 
Carol Parker
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said this on
02 Jan 2010 7:37:39 AM PDT
I appreciate articles like this. We travel from NB to Florida each year and finding a place I can eat is difficult. I am lucky my husband is very caring but I sure would like to have more places to eat so he has a larger choice. I LOVE THE OUTBACK!!

 
Dixie Hendren
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said this on
02 Jan 2010 9:27:40 AM PDT
I want more like this.

 
Kindra Nelson
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said this on
02 Jan 2010 12:43:29 PM PDT
My 7 year old daughter has celiac and I have a hard time finding places we can go to eat. Our favorites are Red Robin and Chpitole. I didn't know that the Spaghetti Factory was gluten free. Thank you so much for sharing this with us!!

 
Shannon
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said this on
11 Dec 2012 10:17:26 AM PDT
If your child likes Chuck E Cheese, many of them now offer gluten-free pizza.

 
K. Doramus
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said this on
04 Jan 2010 1:18:34 PM PDT
We have visited all the same restaurants and found the same results. A gluten-free menu is available at Olive Garden and the mixed grill is excellent, another restaurant with gluten free menu is P. F. Chang and it has great gluten free offerings for those that love Chinese food.

 
Linda
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said this on
16 Jan 2010 8:45:17 PM PDT
Casey's also offers a list of gluten free options in their restaurants--just ask the hostess when you are being seated. They list the regular menu items that are safe as well as a selection of items that can modified to ensure they meet our dietary needs.

If you like fish, the Maui Maui is fabulous!

 
Angie
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said this on
19 Jan 2010 7:38:38 AM PDT
Thank you for this article. We have a little girl that has been very sick. She just turned 2 and we found out that she has celiac. I found this to be very helpful for us. We have two other children and finding places to eat that are really "gluten free" is a challenge. Thank you

 
Angie
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said this on
03 May 2010 8:39:55 AM PDT
I no longer eat at Applebee's because of the gluten ambivalence. I do however find that most restaurants are really willing to make accommodations if you ask. Red Lobster and Cracker Barrel have been very accommodating! Outback is my favorite gluten-free place to eat. I love that Thunder from Down under!

 
Marcel Génetay
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said this on
20 Dec 2010 9:49:24 AM PDT
Over here in Sweden, it is the national policy of McDonald's and Burger King to have gluten-free hamburger bread available in all their restaurants. This has been the case for at least five years now. And since summer this year, Pizza Hut has been offering gluten-free pizza crusts at all their Swedish restaurants.

I know this is the case in several other European countries, at least when it comes to the hamburger chains.

We celiacs as consumers really need to start putting pressure on these chains if we want change. It is absurd that I can waltz into any McDonald's restaurant in, say, Sweden or Finland and order a gluten-free hamburger without any confusion, and not do the same in for example the U.K. or the U.S.

Surely they are losing millions of potential customers each year, which ought to be a compelling argument, if nothing else is...

 
Rachel
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said this on
04 Aug 2011 11:11:57 AM PDT
Thank you so much for this article. My sister lives in NE and when we visited Philadelphia for NCECA last year for her ceramic art show, we went to The Old Spaghetti Factory. I ordered salad out of precaution and found the staff to be very attentive to my needs. Now that I know they offer gluten free pasta as well, I may have to ask if their pasta contains corn as I am also allergic to that as well as milk, yeast, wheat, corn, and hot dogs!

 
Tawni
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said this on
24 Oct 2012 3:45:40 PM PDT
I live in Oklahoma, and there is a chain here (it's in a few other states as well) called Mazzio's that offers a gluten-free pizza. It's not on the menu, and you have to ask for it. My doctor told me about it. I tried it and it was pretty good! I just wanted to share in case anyone had a Mazzio's nearby.

 
Shanon
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said this on
04 Jun 2013 7:30:01 PM PDT
If you live in the Oklahoma area of Tuttle or Newcastle, another place I just ran across was called Pizza 360 off of highway 37 that now offers gluten-free pizza. It was VERY yummy!!




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KathleenH, I swear by MatteosPizza and they make National Delivery. I have been known to buy them by the dozen. https://www.matteospizza.com/ BellaMonica's is not a bad corn based crust. By not bad I mean "suprisingly good" that can be bought at most grocery stores. Here is there ZIP locator page to see if they are carried in your local area. http://glutenfreepizza.typepad.com/gluten-free-pizza/where-to-find-bella-monica.html I hope this is helpful. posterboy,

Hey all--have Hashimoto's and am being worked up for epigastric discomfort and IBS like symptoms--- My blood work had an IgA within the lower end of normal range, negative TTG, but weakly positive DGP. My endoscopy showed a "nodular" duodenum with the biopsy stating there was "reactive lymphoid hyperplasia"... I have a follow-up with the GI in 3 weeks. Wondering about any help?

DH wasn't linked to celiacs until 1967 from my research...

I was at a used book sale yesterday and happened to see an old dermatological textbook. Of course the first thing I looked up was dh just to see what it had to say. What I read shocked me as well as scared me half to death. The description of dh was right on, severe itching, blistering, bilateral, arms/elbows etc. but there was no mention at all of celiac, wheat, gluten or anything along that line. The reason they gave for the cause of dh was "a manifestation of an internal cancer," and later it said it results from cancer, usually cancer of the ovaries or one other that I can't remember. Being a hypochondriac, this was about enough to put me into cardiac arrest. I looked at the publication date and it was printed in 1963 which really isn't all that far back. Has anyone else ever heard of this?? I thought by 1963 they were quite certain that dh was a form of celiac or did it come way after that? Sorry if I'm freaking anyone out by asking this. That's not my intent at all, but since cancer is one of my biggest fears I found this rather unsettling.

Feeneyja, This will be a little long but I will try to be brief as possible. See this discussion thread that talks about how Pellagra is often diagnosed as other disease's today because doctor's rarely recognize it today in a clinical setting. Pellagra's is described as the 3 D's if you don't count the 4th D of death if it goes long enough and is not diagnosed in a timely manner. Dementia (Neurological) Digestive (GI problems), Dermatitis issues (Ezcema, Psorsias, Acne etc.) According to mdguidelines website http://www.mdguidelines.com/pellagra indicates that quoting ?The diagnosis of pellagra is straightforward when the classic rash is present but may be elusive if there are only gastrointestinal and/or neurological manifestations.? And why I believe in many cases Pellagra goes undiagnosed today. Because doctor's have forgotten how it presents. A longer researcher article about the neurological presentations of pellagra mention the many ways a Niacin deficiency can present itself. Here is the link https://www.hindawi.com/journals/cggr/2012/302875/ and I will quote some of the neurological/dementia related symptom's of an undiagnosed pellagra patient. "Mental symptoms were wider than dementia, in that depression, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, mania, obsessions, and a whole range of psychoses with auditory and visual hallucinations were well described, along with personality change and sociopathic and drug and alcohol addictive behaviours. Panic disorders were seen as was a general inability to deal with physical or mental stress. Poor brain development such as hydrocephalus or cerebral palsy was also common. Acute delirium or even coma occurred, with some patients having myoclonus and other extrapyramidal signs reminiscent of the spongiform encephalopathies. The dementias of pellagra included features akin to Lewy body, Alzheimer?s, frontotemporal, vascular, and prion diseases. Parkinsonism was also common and a festinant gait was first described in pellagrins. Tremors of various descriptions, including asymmetric rest tremors, were noted and some patients had typical paralysis agitans. Pellagrins had a characteristic expressionless facies, so some signs of parkinsonism were present in most cases. Many features of pellagra closely resemble the nonmotor aspects of PD. The neurological manifestation did not stop there because other degenerative conditions, such as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like picture, were described, with fasciculation of the tongue and upper and lower motor neuron signs. Cerebellar syndromes occurred and vertigo was frequent. Headaches, sensory and pain syndromes, epilepsy, and involuntary movements were noted as well as sleep disturbances. Cord lesions were also seen, as was optic atrophy, so there were multiple sclerosis (MS), like variants." It is me again. You can see the neurological symptom's of Pellagra are severe and wide ranging. Taking Niacinamide 3/day for 6 months can alleviate many of these symptom's if your daughter has subclinical pellagra and the doctor's don't know to look for it. I had deep depression for many, many years and I shudder to think now that only a Vitamin could of helped me 30+ years ago and the doctor's didn't know to look for it. Shoot it isn't just Niacin. All B-Vitamin's help your stress levels. IF you have stress B-Vitamins can help your stress levels. I take Folic Acid for Blood pressure problems and it keeps my BP with in a normal range. A article on celac.com discussed this topic in detail a few months ago. https://www.celiac.com/articles/24658/1/A-Differential-Diagnosis-How-Pellagra-Can-be-Confused-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html I hope it is helpful. Good luck on your continued journey. If you have never heard of Pellagra you are not alone. Dr. Heaney discusses why this is so in his online article Pellagra and the 4 D's. http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/11/18/pellagra-and-the-four-ds/ If you don't have time to read the whole hindawi article I also suggest this shorter but informative blog about why a Niacin deficiency can cause dementia related conditions. https://pellagradisease.wordpress.com/ Then decide for yourself and your daughter's sake to decide whether to take Niacinamide or not to see if it helps the D's symptom's she is experiencing (Digestive, Dementia etc.) The International Journal of Celiac Disease makes note of this in their research that Pellagra could be contributing to symptom's being diagnosed as Celiac disease today instead of a possible (co-morbid) Pellagra that causes the same symptom's. When they discuss how Pellagra and Celiac disease are related (Co-Morbid) in a Celiac diagnosis are surprised to find that in 58% of Celiac's -- can also be diagnosed with Pellagra. See this link http://pubs.sciepub.com/ijcd/3/1/6/ Quoting 3. Pellagra and celiac disease "The two diseases can be connected in two aspects. 58% of pellagra patients were shown to have malabsorption and many had intestinal pathology on biopsies [36, 37]. Alternatively, Pellagra was described in celiac disease [38]. The skin manifestations in pellagra might have some additional etiologies, since multiple nutrient deficiencies are at the origin of the cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease. The following nutritional deficiencies inducing skin rashes, were describe in celiac disease: Zinc, Iron, Vitamin A, E, B12, niacin, folate, selenium and essential fatty acids [39, 40]." If one is being diagnosed incorrectly the other co-morbid conditions can continue to cause Celiac like symptom's. But if the majority of those who have been diagnosed as Celiac could be helped by taking Niacinamide I see no you reason you shouldn't try it. Or at least research it some more. Again good luck on your continued journey. 2 Timothy 2: 7 ?Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things? this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,