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Frequency of Autoantibodies in Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 01/29/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to compare levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (anti-GAD), islet cell antibody (ICA), thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO), thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG), antinuclear antibodies (FANA), antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-ds DNA), antibody to Sjögren syndrome A antigen (anti-SSA), antibody to Sjögren syndrome B antigen (anti-SSB), Smith antibody (anti-Sm), smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), and antimitochondrial antibody liver-kidney microsome (AMA-LKM) in patients with celiac disease against healthy control subjects,  and autoimmune hypothyroid patients.

 The research team included Erkan Caglar, Serdal Ugurlu, Aliye Ozenoglu, Gunay Can, Pinar Kadioglu, and Ahmet Dobrucali. They are affiliated variously with Fatih Sultan Mehmet Education and Research Hospital, the Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty at the University of Istanbul, and Ondokuz Mayis University in Samsun, Turkey. They studied a total of 31 patients with celiac disease, 34 patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism and 29 healthy subjects.

The team used immunofluorescence to assess anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, anti-GAD, anti-TPO and anti-TG were studied by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), and AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA.

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Researchers used retrospective analysis to assess clinical data and the results of free thyroxine-thyroid stimulating hormone (FT4-TSH). The team used SPSS ver 13.0 for data analysis, and the χ2 method for comparisons within groups.

They found that the frequency of anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-GAD, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA did not differ significantly between the groups.

They found levels of anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies to be markedly higher (<0.001) in autoimmune hypothyroid patients as compared with other groups.

Previous studies have shown an increased frequency of autoimmune diseases of other systems in people with celiac disease.  Autoimmune antibodies specific for other autoimmune diseases appeared no more frequent in people with celiac disease.

Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

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3 Responses:

 
Hallie
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said this on
31 Jan 2010 11:09:30 PM PDT
Has anyone checked the frequency of anticentromere antibody in people with celiac. I have the DQ8 gene, and my anticentromere B test shows sky-high.

 
Peggy Detmers
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said this on
08 Feb 2010 7:25:29 AM PDT
I am a biologist with celiac disease. I have relatives with no digestive display of gluten intolerance yet suffer from a myriad of autoimmune problems that go away on a Gluten Free/Casein Free diet. As a skinny track athlete I dropped on the track from diabetes in high school, then got multiple sclerosis in college, along with migraines, fibromyalgia, mitral valve prolapse and chronic fatigue. ALL gone on a Gluten Free/Casein Free diet at 49 years old! I think the general population has all those auto-immune antibodies due to the neolithic diet. Seeds are indigestible. They evolved that way. Those undigested seed proteins in the bloodstream are causing all these syndromes. As long as my family avoids them and we remain well. Eat lean meats, no seed veggies and fruit. It WORKS!!!

 
Paul
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said this on
27 Feb 2010 4:59:54 PM PDT
I was wondering whether or not the celiac patients had active disease. It they didn't, then the results (no increase in auto-antibodies) would make more sense to me.




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