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Frequency of Autoantibodies in Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 01/29/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to compare levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (anti-GAD), islet cell antibody (ICA), thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO), thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG), antinuclear antibodies (FANA), antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-ds DNA), antibody to Sjögren syndrome A antigen (anti-SSA), antibody to Sjögren syndrome B antigen (anti-SSB), Smith antibody (anti-Sm), smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), and antimitochondrial antibody liver-kidney microsome (AMA-LKM) in patients with celiac disease against healthy control subjects,  and autoimmune hypothyroid patients.

 The research team included Erkan Caglar, Serdal Ugurlu, Aliye Ozenoglu, Gunay Can, Pinar Kadioglu, and Ahmet Dobrucali. They are affiliated variously with Fatih Sultan Mehmet Education and Research Hospital, the Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty at the University of Istanbul, and Ondokuz Mayis University in Samsun, Turkey. They studied a total of 31 patients with celiac disease, 34 patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism and 29 healthy subjects.

The team used immunofluorescence to assess anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, anti-GAD, anti-TPO and anti-TG were studied by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), and AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA.

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Researchers used retrospective analysis to assess clinical data and the results of free thyroxine-thyroid stimulating hormone (FT4-TSH). The team used SPSS ver 13.0 for data analysis, and the χ2 method for comparisons within groups.

They found that the frequency of anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-GAD, anti-Sm, anti-ds DNA, AMA-LKM, ASMA, ANA and ICA did not differ significantly between the groups.

They found levels of anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies to be markedly higher (<0.001) in autoimmune hypothyroid patients as compared with other groups.

Previous studies have shown an increased frequency of autoimmune diseases of other systems in people with celiac disease.  Autoimmune antibodies specific for other autoimmune diseases appeared no more frequent in people with celiac disease.

Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

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3 Responses:

 
Hallie
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said this on
31 Jan 2010 11:09:30 PM PDT
Has anyone checked the frequency of anticentromere antibody in people with celiac. I have the DQ8 gene, and my anticentromere B test shows sky-high.

 
Peggy Detmers
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said this on
08 Feb 2010 7:25:29 AM PDT
I am a biologist with celiac disease. I have relatives with no digestive display of gluten intolerance yet suffer from a myriad of autoimmune problems that go away on a Gluten Free/Casein Free diet. As a skinny track athlete I dropped on the track from diabetes in high school, then got multiple sclerosis in college, along with migraines, fibromyalgia, mitral valve prolapse and chronic fatigue. ALL gone on a Gluten Free/Casein Free diet at 49 years old! I think the general population has all those auto-immune antibodies due to the neolithic diet. Seeds are indigestible. They evolved that way. Those undigested seed proteins in the bloodstream are causing all these syndromes. As long as my family avoids them and we remain well. Eat lean meats, no seed veggies and fruit. It WORKS!!!

 
Paul
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said this on
27 Feb 2010 4:59:54 PM PDT
I was wondering whether or not the celiac patients had active disease. It they didn't, then the results (no increase in auto-antibodies) would make more sense to me.




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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hey All, I was wondering if anyone has tried gluten free pizza? I'm specifically talking about the store bought kind. I'm looking for a cheat meal - I've been eating mainly non processed fresh food but I need a little something to stay sane every now and then. I'm from New York so i'd say I have a pretty high standard of pizza lol. Are there any good frozen ones that are worth eating? I don't think i've ever eaten a frozen pizza in my life but I don't particularly have the time right now to make my own. Also while I'm posting I figure i'll ask. I'm going to this event with my friend at her work. It's like a dinner party. How do I navigate this situation food wise? Should I just eat at home and get drinks there or plan to eat there but take snacks just in case nothing seems safe? Thanks guys!

Hi Dalek, JMG has it right, any food with wheat, rye or barley is a gluten containing food. In addition, watch out for malt, which is sometimes made from barley. That includes the malt in beers.

Interesting!! I'm going to share that with her dr. I'll have to look into the gluten sensitivity more myself, the main reason we started testing is due to poor growth. As I learned more, I've seen several symptoms that could be explained by celiac. I like feeling informed so I'll know what to talk to the dr about or ask about. I think those are the results we are waiting for still, I couldn't remember the name.

Call your doctor's office and ask them to relay your request to the doctor to amend the test request, they should be able to sort it without an additional meeting and delay. Worth a try anyway I think the Biocard tests TTG IGA and it may give you an indication. Do post your results here as I'm sure others will be interested in its effectiveness. If it's negative however remember that there are several celiac tests for a reason. Some test on one, some on another etc... However my guess is your doctor will dismiss them and want their own testing. That's the usual experience.

Waiting for the EMA, I bet. Keep advocating! this is interesting. If celiac disease is excluded, she might still have a gluten sensitivity. There just is not specific test for that. http://theglutensummittranscripts.s3.amazonaws.com/Dr_Umberto_Volta.pdf