No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Long-term Clinical Significance of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Children with Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 03/03/2010 - A team of researchers set out to assess long-term outcomes of thyroid function and autoimmunity in a large population of children with celiac disease.

The research team included Alessandra Cassio, MD, Giampaolo Ricci, MD, Federico Baronio, MD, Angela Miniaci, MD, Milva Bal, MD, Barbara Bigucci, MD, Veronica Conti, MD, and Alessandro Cicognani, MD.

To accomplish this, they conducted a longitudinal, retrospective study at the Pediatric Department, University of Bologna, Italy (duration of follow-up, 8.9 +- 4.0 years).

Ads by Google:

In all, the team examined one hundred thirty-five consecutive patients diagnosed between June 1990 and December 2004 and followed on a gluten-free diet.

To be included, researchers required study subjects to maintain good dietary compliance and duration of follow-up for at least 3 years. A total of 101 patients showed no positive antithyroid titers during the follow-up, while 86 remained euthyroid; 15 showed high thyroid-stimulating hormone values at diagnosis that normalized in 11 cases after 12 to 18 months of gluten withdrawal. A total of 31 patients showed persistently positive antibody titers, with 23 of those (74%) remained consistently euthyroid during the follow-up and 8 (26%) had a subclinical hypothyroidism.

Children with growth retardation or gastroenterological symptoms at diagnosis and different lengths of gluten exposure showed similar rates of positive antibodies.

In children with celiac disease, antithyroid antibodies have a low clinical value for predicting the development of thyroid hypo-function during the indicated surveillance period. They encourage a more comprehensive follow-up.

Source:
J Pediatr. Volume 156, Issue 2, Page A2; February 2010

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


No, I didn't get a endoscopy or even a blood test. I got digestive as well as other problems though on a number of occasions after being gluten free and accidentally eating something with gluten. My symptoms were severe and dramatic so it was obvious to me that I had celaic disease. I wou...

Thankyou for your advice i am getting so confused as some people are saying you dont need the biopsy and others are saying you do need it as it comes with other tests connected to thyroid, iron etc? just want to start being gluten free asap! did you go for the endoscopy?

Hello One drawback is that there are no guarantees. You may go through the testing process and not get the answer you want or need. I did go through testing after having been gluten free and was stunned when I was told it was negative. By that point I'd gone through the challenge and seen...

For me personally a medium result, in that situation, would be enough to convince me that I had celiac disease. Probably the standard of care is to also get a biopsy. Going gluten free is difficult so some people want to do all the tests they can so they can make the best choice. Generally more...

Hi all i hope you can help me i have just had blood tests for celiac and they both come back as a positive result the 1st test was a low reading but the 2nd test was a medium result, i am now waiting a 4 week wait for a endoscopy/biopsy. Not trying to get out of the endoscopy as i have had this p...