No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Health Canada Seeks Input for Gluten-Free Label Regulations


Health Canada needs public input (photo courtesy of TKOwned)

Celiac.com 05/17/2010 - Finding gluten-free food is hard enough without having to worry if your "gluten-free" labeled food is really gluten-free. For those of us that become increasingly ill from ingesting a small amount of gluten, improper  food labeling can  be a matter of life or death.

Since 2007, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been contemplating potential revisions for the current “gluten-free” labeling of foods by food manufacturers. As the FDA  requirements currently stand, there is very little protection for celiacs and gluten sensitive sufferers. However the new law,  if approved, will require companies labeling their products as “gluten-free” to guarantee that their product is completely free of wheat, rye, barley, and oats and any crossbred hybrids or fillers containing wheat, rye or barley or oats, that do not test at less than 20 ppm for gluten.

Ads by Google:

Meanwhile as  we gluten-sensitive American's continue to wait  patiently for a final resolve for the FDA requirements for gluten, Canadians are actively revising their labeling regulations for gluten-free. Health Canada has proposed changes in the current labeling regulations for gluten-free. According to the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations, “No person shall label, package, sell or advertise a food in a manner likely to create an impression that it is a gluten-free food unless the food does not contain wheat, including spelt and kamut, or oats, barley, rye or triticale or any part thereof.” Additionally the words, “gluten-free” is not permitted on any packaged foods containing oats; even if the oats are uncontaminated.

Health Canada is now seeking input from Canadian citizens and shareholders on the proposed labeling regulations to help share information which will aid in the development of proposed changes. The Health Canada website is open to the public for comments from May 13, 2010 until July 11, 2010. For more information on the proposed revisions of Canadian gluten-free labeling, please visit the Health Canada website at:

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


I think for adults who are disabled or have really low incomes, they should be allowed to keep their Rx. But anyone else who is an adult and has a job, they should pay their own way. There are so many options available in the UK now and their gluten-free options are really good. You have bette...

Ennis....pertaining to food deductions, you can deduct the price difference between those items that you would have to buy a gluten free version of because there are no other options......like all the mixes and things mentioned. Chips, not so much, as many chips are already gluten free so it wou...

Thanks for the info. I will ask the GI about my twin sister and nephews to see if they need to be tested regularly too. I'm hoping our insurance will pay for gene testing also to help rule any of us out if possible.

Blood work in so far- Tissue Transglutaminase IgA Ab 7/18/17 <2 U/mL Comment: Negative 0 - 3 Weak Positive 4 - 10 Positive >10 Tissue Transglutaminase IgG Ab ...

In the face of budget cuts, and in a move that may offer a glimpse of things to come, doctors with the the UK's National Health Service are eliminating gluten-free food prescriptions for adults, beginning in parts of Devon. As of July 1, the Northern, Eastern and Western Devon Clinical Commissio...