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Gluten-Free Camping


gluten-free camping (photo courtesy of stevecadman)

Celiac.com 05/20/2010 - The weather is getting warm and it's almost that time again-time to go camping! Camping is supposed to be relaxing and fun. Most people camp to escape the monotony of the daily rut, and to get back to the basics. Eating gluten-free while camping is really easy, once you know what to bring and what to avoid.

Camping trips usually consist of the same easy to prepare foods. Chili, pasta, canned soups, hot chocolate, sandwiches, hot cereal, trail mix and  s'mores are the high-lights of most camping meals. All of those things can easily be prepared gluten-free. In fact, many gluten-free already prepared foods can be used for camping trips. Anything canned or boxed that you normally enjoy at home, can typically be converted to camping food.

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It is important to eat the perishable foods first. A  camping trip lasting for more than one night can render perishable foods inedible. That's why it's important to eat  refrigerated food on the first day or two, and save the shelf-stable food for the remainder of the trip. Store  perishables in a cooler with plenty of ice and/or cold packs. To grill gluten-free food,  avoid gluten contamination by using a grill from home. Using the grill provided at the camping site is possible, but using aluminum foil or a pan as a buffer  will keep food away from gluten contamination. There are even special racks with ridges that can be placed on the the grill and will keep food from touching the grill.

Two Day Sample Meal Plan (everything should be gluten-free):

Day 1-
  • Breakfast- Pancakes with fresh berries and real maple syrup
  • Snack- Energy Bars
  • Lunch- Sandwiches with gluten-free bread
  • Snack- Carrots & celery sticks
  • Dinner- Instant mashed potatoes, instant gravy, grilled meat and/or veggies. 
  • Dessert- S'mores (see recipe below)
Day 2-
Make sure to buy all gluten-free products. Don't forget the gluten-free sunscreen and the gluten-free insect repellent.

Gluten-Free S'mores Recipe

Gluten-Free Smores (photo courtesy of adactio)Ingredients
To Make
1. Put your marshmallow on a fire safe skewer. Heat the marshmallow over an open flame until it begins to brown and melt.
2. Break the graham cracker in half. Sandwich the chocolate between the cracker and the hot marshmallow. Allow the chocolate to melt and the marshmallow to cool a moment before eating.
3. Add strawberries or other gluten-free favorites.

Happy Trails!

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1 Response:

 
family camping
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said this on
21 May 2010 5:56:33 PM PDT
Thank you for your tips, it is so easy to forget about the possibility of cross-contamination. My son is gluten intolerant and most people make such a big deal out of it, but there are really so many products available nowadays that it should be no problem. Sure the cost is higher, but the selection is quite good. The biggest problem is psychological: he cannot eat everything that other kids eat, but needs to have his own "version".




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BOBS RED mill makes an all purpose flour with no rice try Quinoa flour buckwheat flour tapioca chic pea flour coconut flour almond meal ground into a flour flax meal all these things make great " toast" and healthy alternatives to too much rice flour yummy

Oh yeah. I'm 6 months in and still have bad days, even though I know I'm not eating gluten. It takes a long time to heal. I have been on here a lot in the past 6 months venting because I didn't feel good. I just posted today about how tired I still am. Everyone has basically said the same thing - give it time. Be patient. It can take a long time. Some people said it can take a year. Hang in there.

Ok, so I have another question for all of you professional Celiacs. I read an article recently that talked about a study that was done on people with Celiac's disease, which said that some of them (a small number) had high levels of arsenic in their systems because of all of the rice products that they eat. Now, I don't eat a ton of rice, but we do have gluten-free pasta a couple times a week, my son and I like rice Chex, and I know there's brown rice flour in the pizza crusts I use and in the gluten-free bread that I eat. How worried about arsenic poisoning do we need to be? I'm not downing rice at every meal but I do eat it daily, I'm sure. I rarely eat rice, rice. Usually it's the rice flour that's in things. Is this one more thing to keep me up at night? Because now I'm like, "Oh this is great. I'm trading gluten for arsenic." I need to eat carbs. If I just eat fruits and veggies and meat I'll lose weight which stresses me out. I want to be able to eat toast with peanut butter and eggs but I worry my toast is killing me. Am I being a little dramatic.

So I've been gluten free for 6 months. I gave it up the day of my endoscopy and never looked back. I was a fairly silent Celiac. My blood work was always normal (never anemic, malnourished), I didn't have all the horrible symptoms that others do. I think I caught it early and that those things were definitely coming. Since going gluten-free I notice that my belly is better. I still have days where it's not great, but in the last month I've noticed that it's consistently pretty good. I don't hardly ever get stomach aches. I've lost 16 lbs and I'm never bloated. Those things are good. But, aside from that, I don't feel much different than I did before. I'm still tired a lot. But I have two kids under 4 and I run a non-profit. I have horrible anxiety and that's only increased since finding out about my Celiac (it's health anxiety and it freaked me out big time that I have an AI disorder). I feel like my complexion looks the same (never had an issue with that). I just read stories on here that talk about how the brain fog lifted quickly, or how people don't feel tired anymore, etc. I'm still a zombie sometimes. Has anyone else has this experience? Maybe my body was doing such a good job compensating for my Celiac that I wasn't really very symptomatic to begin with - and that the tiredness I feel isn't due to gluten. Oh, FYI, I had a full thyroid panel done in December and it was all normal.

Your daughter could have non celiac gluten sensitivity. That would correspond to negative celiac tests coupled with positive reaction to the gluten free diet. Whilst there are similarities to celiac presentation it appears that neuro symptoms are more common in ncgs patients. That seems to be the case for me anyway! The condition is as yet poorly understood but there is progress being made, check out a topic I just started on the pre diagnosis thread with some info and links. The remarks by umberto Volta in particular are just about the best summation I've yet seen on where the research is at. I will post a link later.