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Irritable Bowel Syndrome Could Be Tied to Gluten Issues


Celiac.com 05/28/2010 - Celiac disease research is linking Irritable Bowel Syndrome with gluten intolerance and doctors are recommending IBS sufferers, especially those with diarrhea-predominant IBS, to get tested for gluten issues or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, often affecting the entire body and manifesting various physical and mental symptoms, and a gluten-free diet is the simple treatment for this disease.

New research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has shown that people with IBS are four times more likely to have celiac disease than those without IBS. Doctors, often uneducated about celiac disease or improperly taught that its symptoms are dramatic, don’t associate the common symptoms of IBS, stomachaches, bloating, fatigue, and diarrhea, with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

In the January 2009 issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, the American College of Gastroenterology began recommending that doctors screen patients who manifest symptoms of IBS for celiac disease as well. The diagnosis is easy to test for. Simple blood tests detect the disease over ninety percent of the time. The diagnosis is then confirmed by an upper endoscopy. A small, flexible tube is slipped into the mouth of the sedated patient, down his esophagus and stomach and into the first part of the small intestine, where biopsies are taken and then examined for changes seen in celiac disease.

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After a correct diagnosis is made, people with IBS who are also celiac can begin the rapid road to recovery with a gluten-free diet. As people become more aware of celiac disease and gluten intolerance, gluten-free foods and gluten-free cooking become more and more available. There are now many delicious gluten-free recipes available for favorite foods and desserts such as gluten-free pizza, gluten-free muffins, and gluten-free cupcakes. Adults and children alike who are gluten intolerant can still enjoy a gluten-free balanced diet with a variety of gluten-free choices.

In the U.S., a slightly increased rate of celiac diagnosis among adults has already lead to increased support. Gluten-free foods and gluten-free recipes are more readily available than ever. The Gluten-Free Restaurant Awareness Program (GFRAP) assists in the mutually beneficial relationship between people diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten intolerance and restaurants, resulting in an increase in the number of restaurants which can provide service to people following a gluten-free diet while increasing their patronage. Participating restaurants are able to provide gluten-free meals. As more and more people are diagnosed with gluten intolerance, their list of participating restaurants will surely grow.

However, the U.S. remains behind in celiac awareness. This probably has something to do with the fact that celiac disease is the only autoimmune disease that the government doesn’t support with research grants. Centers such as Dr. Green’s Celiac Disease Research Center are one-hundred percent dependent on charitable donations or university funds. Even though diagnosis is slightly up for celiac adults, this isn’t enough to raise awareness and bring relief for the three million people who suffer from celiac disease, nearly ninety-seven percent of whom don’t even know the cause of their painful symptoms. With increased diagnosis, we will surely see increased support, and soon the celiac community will be able to enjoy the same quality of life and food and cooking options which is enjoyed by, for instance, the lactose-intolerant community.

If you have been diagnosed with IBS or have similar symptoms, make an appointment with your doctor today to get tested for celiac disease or gluten intolerance. It may just bring you the relief you’ve been looking for all these years.

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1 Response:

 
shirley knutson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
03 Mar 2011 3:19:23 AM PDT
I am struggling with gluten issues, and appreciate any help I can get. I found this article very helpful. Thank you.




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KathleenH, I swear by MatteosPizza and they make National Delivery. I have been known to buy them by the dozen. https://www.matteospizza.com/ BellaMonica's is not a bad corn based crust. By not bad I mean "suprisingly good" that can be bought at most grocery stores. Here is there ZIP locator page to see if they are carried in your local area. http://glutenfreepizza.typepad.com/gluten-free-pizza/where-to-find-bella-monica.html I hope this is helpful. posterboy,

I was at a used book sale yesterday and happened to see an old dermatological textbook. Of course the first thing I looked up was dh just to see what it had to say. What I read shocked me as well as scared me half to death. The description of dh was right on, severe itching, blistering, bilateral, arms/elbows etc. but there was no mention at all of celiac, wheat, gluten or anything along that line. The reason they gave for the cause of dh was "a manifestation of an internal cancer," and later it said it results from cancer, usually cancer of the ovaries or one other that I can't remember. Being a hypochondriac, this was about enough to put me into cardiac arrest. I looked at the publication date and it was printed in 1963 which really isn't all that far back. Has anyone else ever heard of this?? I thought by 1963 they were quite certain that dh was a form of celiac or did it come way after that? Sorry if I'm freaking anyone out by asking this. That's not my intent at all, but since cancer is one of my biggest fears I found this rather unsettling.

Feeneyja, This will be a little long but I will try to be brief as possible. See this discussion thread that talks about how Pellagra is often diagnosed as other disease's today because doctor's rarely recognize it today in a clinical setting. Pellagra's is described as the 3 D's if you don't count the 4th D of death if it goes long enough and is not diagnosed in a timely manner. Dementia (Neurological) Digestive (GI problems), Dermatitis issues (Ezcema, Psorsias, Acne etc.) According to mdguidelines website http://www.mdguidelines.com/pellagra indicates that quoting ?The diagnosis of pellagra is straightforward when the classic rash is present but may be elusive if there are only gastrointestinal and/or neurological manifestations.? And why I believe in many cases Pellagra goes undiagnosed today. Because doctor's have forgotten how it presents. A longer researcher article about the neurological presentations of pellagra mention the many ways a Niacin deficiency can present itself. Here is the link https://www.hindawi.com/journals/cggr/2012/302875/ and I will quote some of the neurological/dementia related symptom's of an undiagnosed pellagra patient. "Mental symptoms were wider than dementia, in that depression, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, mania, obsessions, and a whole range of psychoses with auditory and visual hallucinations were well described, along with personality change and sociopathic and drug and alcohol addictive behaviours. Panic disorders were seen as was a general inability to deal with physical or mental stress. Poor brain development such as hydrocephalus or cerebral palsy was also common. Acute delirium or even coma occurred, with some patients having myoclonus and other extrapyramidal signs reminiscent of the spongiform encephalopathies. The dementias of pellagra included features akin to Lewy body, Alzheimer?s, frontotemporal, vascular, and prion diseases. Parkinsonism was also common and a festinant gait was first described in pellagrins. Tremors of various descriptions, including asymmetric rest tremors, were noted and some patients had typical paralysis agitans. Pellagrins had a characteristic expressionless facies, so some signs of parkinsonism were present in most cases. Many features of pellagra closely resemble the nonmotor aspects of PD. The neurological manifestation did not stop there because other degenerative conditions, such as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like picture, were described, with fasciculation of the tongue and upper and lower motor neuron signs. Cerebellar syndromes occurred and vertigo was frequent. Headaches, sensory and pain syndromes, epilepsy, and involuntary movements were noted as well as sleep disturbances. Cord lesions were also seen, as was optic atrophy, so there were multiple sclerosis (MS), like variants." It is me again. You can see the neurological symptom's of Pellagra are severe and wide ranging. Taking Niacinamide 3/day for 6 months can alleviate many of these symptom's if your daughter has subclinical pellagra and the doctor's don't know to look for it. I had deep depression for many, many years and I shudder to think now that only a Vitamin could of helped me 30+ years ago and the doctor's didn't know to look for it. Shoot it isn't just Niacin. All B-Vitamin's help your stress levels. IF you have stress B-Vitamins can help your stress levels. I take Folic Acid for Blood pressure problems and it keeps my BP with in a normal range. A article on celac.com discussed this topic in detail a few months ago. https://www.celiac.com/articles/24658/1/A-Differential-Diagnosis-How-Pellagra-Can-be-Confused-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html I hope it is helpful. Good luck on your continued journey. If you have never heard of Pellagra you are not alone. Dr. Heaney discusses why this is so in his online article Pellagra and the 4 D's. http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/11/18/pellagra-and-the-four-ds/ If you don't have time to read the whole hindawi article I also suggest this shorter but informative blog about why a Niacin deficiency can cause dementia related conditions. https://pellagradisease.wordpress.com/ Then decide for yourself and your daughter's sake to decide whether to take Niacinamide or not to see if it helps the D's symptom's she is experiencing (Digestive, Dementia etc.) The International Journal of Celiac Disease makes note of this in their research that Pellagra could be contributing to symptom's being diagnosed as Celiac disease today instead of a possible (co-morbid) Pellagra that causes the same symptom's. When they discuss how Pellagra and Celiac disease are related (Co-Morbid) in a Celiac diagnosis are surprised to find that in 58% of Celiac's -- can also be diagnosed with Pellagra. See this link http://pubs.sciepub.com/ijcd/3/1/6/ Quoting 3. Pellagra and celiac disease "The two diseases can be connected in two aspects. 58% of pellagra patients were shown to have malabsorption and many had intestinal pathology on biopsies [36, 37]. Alternatively, Pellagra was described in celiac disease [38]. The skin manifestations in pellagra might have some additional etiologies, since multiple nutrient deficiencies are at the origin of the cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease. The following nutritional deficiencies inducing skin rashes, were describe in celiac disease: Zinc, Iron, Vitamin A, E, B12, niacin, folate, selenium and essential fatty acids [39, 40]." If one is being diagnosed incorrectly the other co-morbid conditions can continue to cause Celiac like symptom's. But if the majority of those who have been diagnosed as Celiac could be helped by taking Niacinamide I see no you reason you shouldn't try it. Or at least research it some more. Again good luck on your continued journey. 2 Timothy 2: 7 ?Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things? this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,

Read this posted on the FDA.gov site: https://www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/guidancedocumentsregulatoryinformation/allergens/ucm362880.htm

Color me confused. I went to Costco yesterday and there were 2 products there that had GLUTEN FREE plastered on the box but then in the ingredients was a: May contain wheat. How is this possible? How can they still put gluten-free on the box? We should be able to trust gluten-free labeling no?? And second question: How many of you would still buy that item? I REALLY wanted to buy the Island Way Sorbet for my daughter as it is her FAVE. But I didn't want to take the risk. Maybe when she is healthier? I mean it is SORBET?! LOL So frustrating!