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Identifying Celiac Disease Using Quantitative Analysis of Videocapsule Endoscopy Imaging


Columbia University--Photo: CC/Stijn Debrouwere

Celiac.com 06/23/2010 - A team of researchers evaluated the possibility of diagnosing celiac disease using quantitative analysis of videocapsule endoscopy images.

The team included Edward J. Ciaccioa, Christina A. Tennysonb, Suzanne K. Lewisb, Suneet, Krishnareddy, Govind Bhagat, and Peter H.R. Green. They are variously associated with the Department of Pharmacology, Department of Medicine,  Department of Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York.

Images taken with videocapsule endoscopy can be useful for diagnosing celiac disease, but their interpretation is highly subjective. Quantitative disease markers might help to determine the degree of villous atrophy and efficacy of treatment.

The team gathered capsule endoscopy images from a group of 11 celiac patients with small bowel pathology, and from a group of 10 control patients.

Images had a resolution of 576×576 pixels, with 256 grayscale tones, and a frame-rate of 2 s−1.  The team measured over 10×10 pixel sub-images for pixel brightness and image texture. They then averaged the results for for 56×56 sub-images per frame.

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For each patient, the team took measurements at from five locations in the proximal to distal small intestine. At each location, they figured measurements using 200 consecutive image frames (100 s).

For classification with a nonlinear discriminant function, they computed mean frame-to-frame pixel brightness, image texture, periodicity in brightness, and estimated wall motion or intestinal motility.

By pooling the data, the team found that images from the celiac group showed greater texture than did images from control group (p < 0.001).

Images from the celiac disease group exhibited more frame-to-frame brightness variation as well (p = 0.032). Celiac patients showed longer dominant period of brightness in celiacs (p = 0.001), which may indicate reduced motility.

Markers for three-dimensional nonlinear classification of celiacs versus controls showed sensitivity of 92.7% and specificity of 93.5%. Both celiac patients and control subjects showed an approximately linear association between dominant period and small intestinal transit time (r2 = 0.42 and r2 =0 .55, respectively).

The results show that videocapsule images can be used to reveal villous atrophy throughout the small intestine, and to distinguish individuals with celiac disease from individuals without mucosal atrophy.

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1 Response:

 
Jay
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said this on
28 Jun 2010 7:25:53 PM PST
My own diagnosis was by a deep balloon endoscopy sample that confirmed and is seen by the pill cam. The pill cam photo's clearly show the damage to the villa and the tell tale signs of celiac disease but the balloon endoscopy would not reach to that area because of the turning of the lower intestines. The biopsy confirmed the pill cam, and I've lived gluten-free since with outstanding results.




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Thank you i have the colonoscopy on Tuesday and am dreading the prep more than anything lol. I think what ever the outcome I will try a gluten free diet to see if it helps with the symptoms. I've read so many stories of people going gluten free and symptoms such as depression, anxiety...

A positive on any one celiac test should lead to an endoscopy/biopsies being done by a gastroenterologist. You should keep eating gluten until the endoscopy is done.

Hi LexieA, It's perfectly ok to grieve or feel down because of a diagnosis of celiac disease. Feelings are not obligated to perform on command. But, over time you can adjust to the new diet reality and even like it. Getting used to eating mostly whole foods and more natural foods is a goo...

Hertzya, Congrats to you for sticking with your service in spite of celiac disease. That seems like it would be hard to do, And thanks for your service to our country!

Thank you all