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Traditional Ethiopian Teff Injera (Gluten-Free)


Photo: CC/LollyKnit

I have an immensely difficult time finding gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free, yeast-free bread products, so the ingredient list for this recipe couldn't be more ideal for a celiac. The only ingredients: teff, salt, and water. Injera is the bread staple of Ethiopia and is eaten by most households everyday. Injera is traditionally made solely with teff grain, although some modern recipes call for yeast or all-purpose flour as well.  The high iron content of teff makes it a perfect choice for a bread substitute. This recipe is very easy however, injera requires advanced planning and will not work for a last minute meal, as  it can take up to three days for the teff to ferment before cooking is possible.

Traditional Ethiopian Teff Injera (Gluten-Free)

Servings: 20
Ingredients:

  • 3 cups ground teff
  • 4 cup distilled water
  • Himalayan salt to taste
  • Olive oil for the skillet
Note: This is a large batch, as I like to have left-overs. Also, the
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or to an organic acid.'); return false">fermentation process takes a while, so it's nice to have some injera for later. For a smaller batch, cut the ingredients in half.
  1. Mix ground teff with the water and let stand in a bowl covered with a dish towel at room temperature until it bubbles and has turned sour. The fermentation process will take approximately 1-3 days. The fermenting mixture should be the consistency of a very thin pancake batter.
  2. Stir in the salt, a little at a time, until you can barely detect its taste.
  3. Lightly oil  a skillet 8 inches minimum but you can also use a larger one. Heat over medium heat.
  4. Pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet; About 1/4 cup will make a thin pancake covering the surface of an 8 inch skillet if you spread the batter around immediately by turning and rotating the skillet in the air; This is the classic French method for very thin crepes; Injera is not supposed to be paper thin so you should use a bit more batter than you would for crepes, but less than you would for a flapjack pancakes.
  5. Cook briefly, until holes form in the injera and the edges lift from the pan; Do not let it brown, and don't flip it over as it is only supposed to be cooked on one side.
  6. Remove and let cool. Place plastic wrap or foil between successive pieces so they don't stick together.
  7. To serve, lay one injera on a plate and ladle your chosen dishes on top. Serve additional injera on the side. Guests can be encouraged to eat their meal without utensils, instead using the injera to scoop up their food.
Important: Please use caution when eating with your hands. To avoid contamination make sure your hands are very clean with gluten-free soap before eating.

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7 Responses:

 
Maddy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 Jul 2010 12:24:59 PM PDT
Himalayan Salt? According to a lot of current recipes I would have to keep: sea salt, kosher salt, fleur de sel, pink salt, black salt, etc etc etc.
Aren't we getting a little too specific here? And, maybe I'm ignorant but, would most Ethiopians have access to Himalayan salt as a regular staple in their kitchens? Or did some restaurant guru decide this was the salt of the week?
I would like to try the recipe, but don't think I'll buy a special salt for it, especially since the recipe say's to add salt to taste - which means you could use any salt.

 
Destiny
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
06 Jul 2010 10:12:12 AM PDT
Hi Maddy,

I suggest Himalayan salt in my recipes because of the minerals that are derived from that particular salt. However, as with as with any recipe I post, you can use any salt you prefer.

Take care,

Destiny

 
June
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
04 Sep 2010 8:33:50 AM PDT
How do you find ground teff? or how do you grind it? I can only find teff grains un-ground.

 
Mary
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
09 Dec 2011 7:48:56 PM PDT
Please be careful buying injera from Ethiopian stores. They mix barely with it. Unless you make it yourself, do not trust the store bought injera. It is not gluten-free.

 
Dave
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
04 Mar 2012 5:25:03 PM PDT
How is fermented bread "yeast free"? Or is the important thing avoiding packaged yeast? Forgive me if this is an ignorant question!

 
Teffmehl
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
20 Jan 2013 11:03:40 AM PDT
mhhhh very good

 
chuck glenn
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
23 Aug 2013 1:06:31 PM PDT
Injera relies on airborn yeast (which is how it ferments). So this is definitely not yeast-free. If you are a real stickler about that, try adding something like apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to sour it, and use baking soda to leaven it.




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Welcome to the forum. Be sure to browse through the DH section for advice and tips. Glad your wife is gluten free. My hubby was gluten free some 12 years before my diagnosis. Sure makes it a bit easier!

As I am sitting here, I am wearing a retainer. Yep, had a tooth extracted a few months ago. To keep the space open for a future transplant, my dentist ordered a retainer. I read that PUB MED study. One kid. Not very scientific at all! Gluten Free Watchdog agrees that the odds of this kid being glutened by her retainer is slim and none. Like my PCV sprinklers lines, retainers probably do not last a lifetime. Ask your dentist how long they should last. No one wants to eat plastic!

I've had them about six or seven times at several different Starbucks locations. My sister has, also. Neither one of us have had any signs of getting glutened. They are served in a parchment paper bag that should be handed to you straight from the oven sealed. I've heard many internet complaints about the bags being dusty, too many ingredients, unhealthy, etc., but honestly, they are pretty darned tasty! And, when you are traveling and hungry, they are even tastier. They sell out quickly at most Starbucks, but I've been able to purchase one as late at 6 p.m.

I wish they didn't use " gluten" as a headline. People abuse and starve children for a variety of " reasons". gluten-free was just one they picked, it could have been paleo or kosher or whatever...

Ugh! This again..... first ...it was one person...not a study... just someone's speculation. if I am remembering correctly - no one actually tested the retainer. The kid was a 12-16 yr old an drew could have gotten caught eating gluten, etc, etc, etc. And then those internet folks who love to spread " bad news" or use that stuff to further their purpose, jumped on it. And then let's talk to a chemist or plastic scientist - if the plastic leaches our actual proteins, like gluten, wouldn't the plastic piece break down after a while? welcome to the world of Celiac internet myths. adding - none of the Celiac Centers, Associations, etc have warned people not to use a retainers.