22189 Home-style Drop Biscuits (Gluten-Free) - Celiac.com
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Home-style Drop Biscuits (Gluten-Free)


Photo: CC/biskuit

I miss biscuits more than anything. Before going gluten-free, I loved to eat biscuits and gravy, strawberry shortcake (on homemade biscuits) and warm biscuits with honey! There is nothing that compares with the satisfaction of eating a warm homemade biscuit. Which is why the following recipe is so exciting. This is a recipe that can be manipulated to cater to specific dietary restrictions-even mine! There are dairy-free, soy-free and egg-free options included. It might take a couple tries finding the right combination for you, so spend a day making some delicious gluten-free home-style biscuits.

Home-style Drop Biscuits (Gluten-Free)

Servings: 16 large biscuits

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Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cup brown rice flour
  • 2 cup corn starch or potato starch or tapioca starch
  • ½ cup soy flour or sorghum flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 ¾ teaspoons salt
  • 1 ½ teaspoons teaspoons baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 1 stick of butter or gluten-free butter substitute (chilled in the freezer)
  • 1 ¼ cup soy milk 
  • 1 ¼ cup water
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1 egg, beaten (or the equivalent amount of your favorite egg replacement)

To Make:

*Note: 1. If you’re not vegan or dairy free, feel free to use 1 c. buttermilk in place of the soy milk and vinegar. If you’re allergic to soy, try using your usual milk substitute and keep the vinegar in the recipe.
Also reduce the liquid if necessary, you don't want the batter to be too runny.

  1. Preheat your oven to 350F degrees.
  2. In a large mixing bowl thoroughly combine the flour (a fork works well for this), baking powder, salt, baking soda, and xanthan gum.
  3. For an easier time working with the butter, grate the butter into the flour using the small holed side of a box grater. Mix the butter into the flour so that there are no large balls of grated butter.
  4. Add the soy milk, water, vinegar and beaten egg to the flour and stir until the dry and liquid ingredients are combined.
  5. Using a large spoon, drop the dough onto a greased pan to make 16 biscuits.
  6. Cook at 350F degrees for 15 minutes or until golden brown.

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5 Responses:

 
Krista
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
10 Sep 2010 10:49:17 AM PDT
This was my first attempt at gluten free biscuits and they were excellent. I do not follow a gluten free diet but I eat a lot of whole grains and I like to experiment in the kitchen.

I made a half-batch of these, substituting home-ground quinoa flour for the soy and used half corn starch, half tapioca flour. For the egg I used 1 Tbsp ground flax + 3 Tbsp water. I also only used 3/4 cup of soy milk for the liquid instead of 1 1/2 cup total liquid (remember, half batch).

They were very tasty, and this is coming from a person who still eats gluten-containing biscuits. Certainly perfect for my biscuits and gravy for breakfast, using a sunflower seed gravy (try it, it's yummy).

 
gayle
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
07 Sep 2011 8:34:26 PM PDT
Thank you for the recipe and most importantly thank you for educating your doctors. You go girl!

 
Beth
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 Aug 2012 3:43:04 PM PDT
My biscuits turned out very rubbery. Don't quite know what I did wrong. I think the recipe needed about twice the butter.

 
hope
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
02 Jun 2014 3:20:23 AM PDT
Please do not encourage people to use buttermilk or eggs as it is bad for people. This cows milk is temporarily for her beloved calf. It is not normal to expect and animal to loose her baby then suckle you her whole life. All milk has puss in it from this. In the egg factory hundreds of male baby chicks are ground up alive because the egg industry does not want them. The eggs clog the heart arteries and valves and are not good for the pancreas. Go vegan.

 
Melissa
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said this on
22 Sep 2014 4:14:59 PM PDT
I believe adding the chilled butter was key to making these biscuits. They were great!! I didn't change a thing. Only basted them with salted butter. Delicious!!




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