No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

High Levels of Oxidative DNA Damage in Children with Celiac Disease


New study on DNA damage and celiac disease

Celiac.com 09/20/2010 - People with celiac disease face increased risk of cancer and a large amount of circumstantial evidence suggests that oxidatively damaged DNA may be used to help predict future cancer development in celiac patients.

To evaluate that hypothesis, a research team set out to assess and describe oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in celiac disease patients.

Anna Szaflarska-Popławska, Agnieszka Siomek, Mieczysława Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Daniel Gackowski, Rafał Różalski, Jolanta Guz, Anna Szpila, Ewelina Zarakowska and Ryszard Oliński comprised the research team. They are associated with the college of medicine at Nicolaus Copernicus University, in Bydgoszcz, Poland.

They found that children with celiac disease have higher than normal levels of the oxidative DNA damage biomarkers urinary 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua, regardless of following a gluten-free diet.

To measure urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua, and levels of oxidative DNA damage in the leukocytes, as well as the level of antioxidant vitamins, the team used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC/gas chromatography with isotope dilution mass detection.

Ads by Google:

They observed parameters for DNA damage in a group of children with untreated celiac disease, in a group of children with celiac disease following a strict gluten-free diet, and in a control group of healthy children.

They found that the two groups of celiacs showed significantly higher overall levels of 8-oxodG in DNA isolated from the leukocytes and from the urine samples than did the control subjects, without regard to diet. There was no significant difference  between treated and untreated celiacs. That means being on a gluten-free diet offered no protection from oxidative DNA damage for all children with celiac disease.

One key difference was that the untreated celiac children showed significantly lower levels of retinol and α-tocopherol, vitamin A and E, compared to the treated celiac children. Between group difference of 0.31 and 3.76 µmol/l, respectively, suggests that a gluten-free diet offers some protection against oxidative damage in treated celiacs.

From the results indicate that oxidative stress and/or oxidatively damaged DNA in celiac patients cannot be explained by diet alone, and that factors independent of diet play an important role.

Supplemental vitamin A and E in celiac disease patients may help minimize the risk of cancer development.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



3 Responses:

 
CeliBelli
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
25 Sep 2010 9:26:29 AM PST
What neither the study abstract, nor this restatement of it, disclose is how long the children had been on the gluten free diet. Had all children in group 'b' been on a gluten free diet since birth? Or had they been diagnosed subsequent to birth, and therefore exposed to gluten for some length of time? In addition, there is no mention of the mothers of these children. If the children were gluten free from birth, were their mothers living gluten free while pregnant?

It seems to me that in order to draw the conclusion that the DNA damage cannot be attributed to diet alone, a study would have to control for these factors. If they want to draw conclusions regarding whether or not diet or something else is at work on the DNA of Celiac children, they would have to use a group of children whose mothers had observed strict gluten free diets throughout pregnancy and who then themselves were on strict gluten free diets from birth.

If they did exercise such strict controls, they do not mention it in their abstract, and Mr. Adams does not probe the study for it. Without such strict controls, the study's conclusion that something other than diet is impacting DNA cannot be considered valid.

 
Gloria Brown
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
27 Sep 2010 10:48:33 AM PST
The influence of gluten ingested from airborne sources needs to be considered when celiac on gluten free and non-gluten free diets are being studied.

 
Clarkie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
27 Sep 2010 2:43:43 PM PST
More proof that we don't really understand celiac yet. We're only seeing one piece of it (the damage to the stomach and digestion, the autoimmune syndrome). People with celiac are more likely to have problems with yeast overgrowth, heavy metal toxicity, fibromyalgia, etc., even long after they've eliminated all gluten from their diets. I really hope the medical communities will pick up on this and start looking at celiac more holistically.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Hi Matt, Thanks for taking the time to reply! I completely agree haha. Thanks for the links - I'll give them a read over! I think it was a mixture of the first time travelling with being gluten-free and the added bonus of the language barrier, it made me dread meal times when u...

Gluten is a protein smaller then blood,bleach does not kill it as it is not a germ. I would replace scratched pans. baking dishes, tubaware, wooden utensils, colanders, etc. Throw out crumby condiment jars and any non gluten-free spices and condiments. Cast Iron can be saved and some metal utensi...

It sounds like your hives resolved. I had a six month bout with them. Antihistamines really helped. My doctors are not sure if Mast Cell or autoimmune is the root cause.

My kid has Raynauds. It freaks her classmates out. She wears shoes and wool socks all year round and we live in a warm state. It is autoimmune. She manages it by layering, turning up the heat, use lots of blanket throws. I have Hashimoto?s and celiac disease. So, having multiple autoi...

Well, you do need to replace some things because they are too porous or damaged to remove gluten. Things like old wooden spoons, scratched non-stick pans, toaster, colander, sponges, etc. Honestly, the list is long, so try getting a few celiac books at the library or Amazon. Consider reading t...