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Kicker with Celiac Disease Looks to Break Guinness Record


Kicker looks to raise celiac awareness. Here, a kick by Yale player Otis Love Guernsy. Phot: Library of Congress

Celiac.com 09/30/2010 - New York arena football kicker, Craig Pinto, will attempt to set a world record for most field goals kicked within a twelve hour period, and to raise money and awareness for celiac disease.

Pinto's effort will get underway on October 10, 2010, when he begins kicking field goals for 12 straight hours.

In addition to raising money and awareness for celiac disease, a condition in which people who consume proteins found in wheat, rye, or barley suffer damage to their digestive tracts, Pinto, who has lived with celiac disease for more than a decade hopes to show that people with celiac disease can remain physically active, and even excel in their chosen activities.

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“With something that has affected me, and is so close to my heart, it only makes sense to utilize things I love – kicking and football – to raise money and awareness for my other passion,” says Craig. “And that is spreading the word and educating people about Celiac Disease.”

Each field goal must be kicked from at least forty yards away from the goal post, and  will be judged by official referees to make sure each kick meets specific record breaking criteria. All proceeds will benefit the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University.

For more information or to make a donation visit www.kicking4celiac.com.

Bethpage High School
10 Cherry Avenue
Bethpage, New York 11714
October 10th, 2010
7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

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