No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Split Pea Soup (Gluten-Free)


The finished split pea soup. Photo: CC-thebittenword

Talk about classic. It doesn't get much more classic than pea soup. I imagine some versions of pea or bean soup must go back hundreds of years, or more. Pea soup is simple, hearty, and delicious. This version of classic split pea soup is a satisfying meal that's gluten-free, low in fat and high in flavor and nutrition. This recipe makes enough soup to serve about four to six people.

Ingredients:
2 teaspoon vegetable oil or bacon grease
1 cup chopped onion
2 celery stalks, chopped
1 large leek, chopped
1 large carrot, chopped
1 large clove of garlic, halved
1 pound dried split peas
2 meaty ham hocks, rinsed
salt and pepper to taste
2 teaspoons lemon juice (optional)

Directions:
For this recipe, you may use either soaked or un-soaked peas. Just remember that un-soaked peas take about 1 to 2 hours of simmering, depending on how solid you want them, while soaked peas take about 40 minutes.

In a medium pot, saute onions in oil or bacon grease. Reduce heat to low, and add split peas, and ham hocks. Add enough water to cover ingredients, and season with salt and pepper.

Skim the foam off the top of the soup, and continue for several minutes until foam stops forming.

Ads by Google:

Cover, and simmer until the peas are soft, or until they have broken down fully, up to 2 hours, stirring occasionally, so they don't stick to the pan.

Peas soak up a lot of water, so, check during the simmer to see if water has evaporated. Add more water as needed to achieve desired texture. Remember, the peas only need to be cooked until tender. Those who like a smoother, creamier texture can cook them longer until they break down.

When the peas are soft and the veggies are cooked, stir in your favorite seasonings and keep on tasting until it's just right.  Add salt, freshly cracked black pepper, and lemon juice.

Remember, when adding lemon juice, or anything acidic, do so at the very end of cooking to avoid hard, underdone peas. Once the soup has cooked just short of desired consistency, remove from heat, and let stand so it will thicken. Remove ham hocks. If desired, strip away meat, chop and add to soup.

Once the soup has thickened, it may be necessary to return it to the heat to warm briefly before serving.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Maria
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
07 Jul 2015 6:11:00 AM PDT
Split pea soup is such a great comfort food! I would ask that you add "Gluten Free" split peas to your ingredient list to reinforce that not all packages of dried split peas are gluten free. I was caught off guard by a package that had no warnings about "may contain wheat" beside the ingredients but had labelled it in fine print in the far random corner of the product. My son is now sick. I think we can't be reminded enough if we are still getting caught by bad labeling and I've been trying to navigate this gluten free diet for over 2 years now. Thanks for the soup recipe!




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

I'm a naturalist -- I don't use drugs, creams, etc. I do, however, scratch** the rash until I'm almost bleeding and then dump isopropyl alcohol in it -- that relieves the itch for quite some time. (Stings at first though.) I get the rashes on my legs. ANYWAY, I have found that a gluten-free diet is the only (or best) approach -- it's certainly the most natural, in my opinion. It took six months before I felt I was cleansed of gluten. I went nine months (or more) without a rash. Then, I mistakenly ate some soup with barley in it. Got the rash. I let it run its course while getting back to & staying on a gluten-free diet. My best advice is just to stay on a gluten-free diet. Be strong, brave. You can do it! ** I should clarify that when my rashes start itching, I can't help but scratch (excessively). I am not suggesting scratching yourself (with or without cause) as a means to an end. Don't scratch if you can.

Nicotinamide helps a great deal. Nicotinamide is a form of Vitamin B3, also called Niacin. Many new Celiacs have trouble absorbing sufficient vitamins and minerals because of intestinal damage. Malabsorption causes malnutrition. Deficiencies of the B Complex vitamins, especially niacin, and vitamins A and D often manifest as skin rashes and exacerbate DH. Recent research has found that treatment with nicotinamide and tetracycline effectively treats DH. Ask your doctor to check for vitamin deficiencies if you haven't already. Also dapsone use may cause iron, B12, and folate deficiencies which may lead to anemia. These should be monitored as well. Hope this helps.

I'm so excited! The Austin area has a new gluten-free restaurant - Guaco Taco. I'm going there tomorrow night for dinner. I love Mexican food and miss being able to eat it out.

I see the original post, and most replies, are old, but I thought I would weigh in as a vegetarian... for almost 25 years now. I wish you all good health!

Hmmm, interesting. That's a good policy!