No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gut Disease May Play a Role in Non-cirrhotic Intrahepatic Portal Hypertension


New study indicates gut disease may play a role in non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension.

Celiac.com 11/25/2010 - Portal hypertension is high blood pressure within the portal vein and its tributaries. Non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH) is portal hypertension that occurs within the liver, that is not triggered by cirrhosis. NCIPH is generally regarded to have a benign prognosis.

A research team examined whether gut-derived prothrombotic factors may contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH). Their results led them to conclude that gut-derived prothrombotic factors may in fact contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of NCIPH.

The team included C. E. Eapen, Peter Nightingale, Stefan G. Hubscher, Peter J. Lane, Timothy Plant, Dimitris Velissaris, and Elwyn Elias.

For their study, the team followed a cohort at a tertiary referral center. They analyzed prognostic indicators in 34 NCIPH patients. The team also looked for associated gut disorders.

Survival rates for transplant-free NCIPH patients from first presentation with NCIPH at 1, 5, and 10 years was 94% (SE: 4.2%), 84% (6.6%), and 69% (9.8%), respectively.

Ads by Google:

Importantly, 18 patients (53%) showed decompensated liver disease.

Three patients (9%) showed ulcerative colitis while five of 31 patients (16%) tested had celiac disease. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that the presence of celiac disease was a predictor of shorter transplant-free survival for these patients (p = 0.018).

Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that people who were older when first presenting with NCIPH, those with hepatic encephalopathy, and those with portal vein thrombosis had lower rates of transplant-free survival

More than one-third (36%) of NCIPH patients showed elevated levels of initial serum IgA anticardiolipin antibody (CLPA), compared with just 6% with Budd–Chiari syndrome (p = 0.032, Fisher’s exact test) and no patients with celiac disease
without concomitant liver disease (p = 0.007).

Under the team's prognostic factors, 53% of NCIPH patients ultimately progress to liver failure, and their data suggest that intestinal disease plays a role in the pathogenesis of intrahepatic portal vein occlusion leading to NCIPH.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


i am thinking you may be LADA, latent autoimmune diabetes of adult, type one, of course. Not to hit you when you are down, but now is the time to realize that you eat to live, not live to eat. find a different source of sensual enjoyment, ie photo, painting, singing, etc. and "hold your nose"...

You might consider the endoscopy. Like I said, some celiacs (about 10%) have negative blood tests. The endoscopy can rule out other issues too (like Crohn?s). Not all celiacs are wasting away either. I hope they figure it out and you feel better fast!

Yes, I do not take iodine salt as well (forgot to add it), I get bubbles after it... That actually worries me a little because in long run what is my thyroid going to say (I do not eat seafood so there is no source of iodine for me at all)? I tried taking iodine supplement but got bad reaction to...

I was eating wheat and gluten at the time of the test. No test or diagnoses was done while I was in hospital they just Gave me a list of could be?s and nothing was done they just sent me home once the sepsis was gone. I went to my auto immune dr because they thought I had lupus or hypothyroid and...