No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

New Gliadin Peptide Plays a Key Role in Celiac Disease


New research on gliadin peptide and celiac disease. Photo: Microscope - CC - Sarah_G

Celiac.com 03/09/2011 - A team of researchers recently identified a novel immunomodulatory gliadin peptide that triggers interleukin-8 release in a chemokine receptor CXCR3-dependent manner only in patients with celiac disease.

The research team included Karen M. Lammers; Sunaina Khandelwal; Fatima Chaudhry; Debby Kryszak; Elaine L. Puppa; Vincenzo Casolaro; and Alessio Fasano.

The same research team had previously reported that the chemokine receptor CXCR3 serves as a receptor for specific gliadin peptides that trigger zonulin release and increase in intestinal permeability.

This mechanism plays an important role in the adverse immune reaction to gluten-containing grains that is central to the classic celiac disease response.

To examine the role of CXCR3 in the immune response to gliadin, the researchers incubated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of both celiac patients and healthy controls with either pepsin-trypsin-digested gliadin or 11 α-gliadin synthetic peptides in the presence or absence of a blocking anti-CXCR3 monoclonal antibody.

Ads by Google:

The team then analyzed supernatants for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, IP-10 (CXCL10), tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ.

Gliadin triggered cytokine production regardless of clinical condition. However, only small number of individuals showed IL-8 production. In those individuals, cells originating from white blood cells were the main source of IL-8 production.

The team used one of a comprehensive panel of synthetic α-gliadin peptides to reproduce the induction of IL-8.

They were able to cease the process by blocking CXCR3 before stimulation with either gliadin or this peptide in the celiac group, but not in the control group.

This suggests that gliadin-induced IL-8 production is CXCR3-dependent only in people with celiac disease.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Are you sure you do not have fractures? I fractured two vertebrae two months after my celiac disease diagnosis DOING NOTHING!!!! Turns out I have osteoporosis from untreated celiac disease. ? Consider a bone scan.

Be sure to let us know how it goes! Help keep them in business by writing a review on Find Me Gluten Free! Enjoy! ?

I'm a naturalist -- I don't use drugs, creams, etc. I do, however, scratch** the rash until I'm almost bleeding and then dump isopropyl alcohol in it -- that relieves the itch for quite some time. (Stings at first though.) I get the rashes on my legs. ANYWAY, I have found that a gluten-free diet is the only (or best) approach -- it's certainly the most natural, in my opinion. It took six months before I felt I was cleansed of gluten. I went nine months (or more) without a rash. Then, I mistakenly ate some soup with barley in it. Got the rash. I let it run its course while getting back to & staying on a gluten-free diet. My best advice is just to stay on a gluten-free diet. Be strong, brave. You can do it! ** I should clarify that when my rashes start itching, I can't help but scratch (excessively). I am not suggesting scratching yourself (with or without cause) as a means to an end. Don't scratch if you can.

Nicotinamide helps a great deal. Nicotinamide is a form of Vitamin B3, also called Niacin. Many new Celiacs have trouble absorbing sufficient vitamins and minerals because of intestinal damage. Malabsorption causes malnutrition. Deficiencies of the B Complex vitamins, especially niacin, and vitamins A and D often manifest as skin rashes and exacerbate DH. Recent research has found that treatment with nicotinamide and tetracycline effectively treats DH. Ask your doctor to check for vitamin deficiencies if you haven't already. Also dapsone use may cause iron, B12, and folate deficiencies which may lead to anemia. These should be monitored as well. Hope this helps.

I'm so excited! The Austin area has a new gluten-free restaurant - Guaco Taco. I'm going there tomorrow night for dinner. I love Mexican food and miss being able to eat it out.