No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Book Review: Gluten Toxicity - The Mysterious Symptoms of Celiac Disease, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance


A book review: Gluten Toxicity

Celiac.com 02/21/2011 - After reading this new book by celiac nurse specialist Shelly Stuart, RN, what shines through above all is her true understanding of the complex nature of gluten-related illnesses, and her heartfelt compassion for patients who suffer from them. Her book is extremely well researched and documented. As a registered nurse and celiac herself,  Ms. Stuart is able to use her strong patient teaching experience to clearly educate the reader about even very complicated subjects. She provides excellent explanations of leaky gut and the pathophysiology of celiac disease, and she is one of the first clinicians to write in-depth about non-celiac gluten intolerance.  Importantly, she makes the point that immune mediated reactions can and do occur in non-celiac gluten intolerance, and backs this up by citing clinical evidence. Another important point made concerns pancreatic insufficiency, which can accompany celiac disease, but few know that this condition can persist even after diagnosis and transition to a gluten-free diet. Her discussion of the many, varied health disorders associated with celiac disease is very comprehensive.

Ads by Google:

One of the most compelling aspects to “Gluten Toxicity” is the many important questions asked regarding the future of clinical research. Ms. Stuart makes it crystal clear that we need to know much more about the physical and mental health effects of gluten-related illness. This can only come about by increasing awareness both within the medical and research communities, and throughout each of our communities. We must all become advocates for greater testing and more accurate diagnosis.

Shelly’s personal story, woven throughout the book, adds interest and a personal appeal, but never attempts to substitute anecdote for the hard science she relies on throughout the book. In fact, at first glance, the book seemed rather technical to me, and I thought it would be best-suited for clinicians, but after reading through to the end, I changed my mind. This is an excellent resource, offering really insightful and accurate explanations for anyone suffering from or attempting to treat gluten related illness. Some of you may be familiar with Cleo Libonati, RN, and the book “Recognizing Celiac Disease”, which was one of the first books to comprehensively make connections between a vast array of medical conditions and celiac disease, and back them up with clinical research citations. Shelly Stuart’s book goes quite a bit farther, to discuss the pathophysiology, symptoms, and diagnosis of a huge number of health conditions associated with celiac disease and also non-celiac gluten intolerance.  

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Bessie Mawbey
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Feb 2011 8:45:43 PM PDT
keep up the good work, you are helping a lot of people understand this disease.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

And this from Consumer Reports: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm Rice aside, stop giving your kids apple juice too as it can contain high levels of arsenic too! Eat real apples -- not juice.

If I am in a bar and it is super busy, I ask for a "to go" cup. Why? If a dishwasher is not being used (or demand is overwhelming it), bartenders are cleaning all the glasses the old fashioned way ( sinks, wash and rinse with disinfectant). Good for killing bacteria I suppose, but maybe not for removing gluten traces. No bar is going to slow down drink orders ($$$$$) to wait for clean glasses from the dishwasher! Is this all true? I can not say. I am just speaking from experience when I was barmaid 30 years ago before there were dedicated bar dishwashers. http://www.servicethatsells.com/blog/how-to-clean-a-beer-glass/ Even if this is "all in my head", I feel better clutching my "to go" cup and can relax. ?

Check out this page and the advice on rice prep: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice

Hi Rachel and welcome I think you've found the single best site on the web for help and advice. Hope it's of use to you. I tested negative for celiac so no referral. My experience with NHS however suggests it could be worth phoning your Gastro's office and asking the admin staff there to check on this. Things get overlooked... I would avoid anything with those warnings on. It's a pain in the arse because, for example, it recently appeared on a brand of nuts I like. However having some experience of production and marketing environments that warning will only be going on the pack if someone in the company thinks there's a chance of contamination. There's always other products to choose from so I don't take the chance. Walkers crisps have given me a reaction, yes even the sodding ready salted ones It's something to do with their production processes. I think Gary Lineker may dance through the factory each week spreading handfuls of flour for good luck. Whatever, I now avoid them. My energy levels improved over a few months after the diet. It took longer the second time after my challenge. I was still noticing improvements / weird resolutions of odd symptoms up to 9 months to a year later... Lots of good advice here: All the best! Matt

Ah.... Settles back, dons funny hat, smokes pipe, plays violin, injects heroin etc... I think you need to treat yourself as your own science experiment. If you're ok at home with all of the drinks then you can almost certainly rule out alcohol intolerance and thank your bodies burgeoning super coeliac powers of gluten detection for the reaction. Clearly your powers have grown in the past five years young jedi... In which case maybe there's a drink you can order which would reduce this risk, maybe asking for the bottle and a clean glass, forgoing ice, straws etc, anything to simplify matters and reduce the number of contaminant variables. One thing I'd avoid would be 'mixers' from the shared line. Not because there's gluten filled drinks going through them, typically its just coke, lemonade and soda water, but because the nozzle sometimes dips into the drink that's being filled. Paranoid? Maybe, but I avoid them now and pay the extra for a bottle. A word on glasses. Most bars have a dedicated glass washer and they're good, to a point. I've worked behind a bar in the past and the washers are only on for a very short time, they can run up to 35 times an hour... I've seen lipstick on glasses from them and whilst the chances of contamination are probably slight... Now if you're out for a night at different places, it will be very hard to work out where its happening. So my suggestion is to go out to one bar only and pick a decent one. Speak to a bartender or manager, explain to them just what a special snowflake you are and get one definitely clean glass at the outset then keep it for the evening and just get it refilled. Pick one drink only and stick to it. I'd suggest wine as maybe its easier on the stomach than the bubbly prosecco and you can get the little bottles without any chance of contamination but that may be nonsense See what happens... If you're ok, then you have an answer. You've become more sensitive and your reacting to trace gluten. *removes funny hat, discards pipe, hides syringe...