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Cladribine Treatment Promising for Type II Refractory Celiac Disease


New study on cladribine treatment for Type II Refractory celiac disease.

Celiac.com 03/25/2011 - A group of researchers recently set out to evaluate cladribine [2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA)] therapy in refractory celiac disease (RCD) Ⅱ.

The team included Greetje J. Tack, Wieke H. M. Verbeek, Abdul Al-Toma, Dirk J. Kuik, Marco W. J. Schreurs, Otto Visser, Chris J. J. Mulder of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology,  at VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Between 2000 and 2010, the research team conducted an open-label cohort-study of RCD Ⅱ patients treated with 2-CdA. They assessed survival rate, enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) occurrence, clinical course, and histological and immunological response rates.

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The study followed a total of  32 patients over an average 31-month period. Eighteen patients responded well to 2-CdA. Patients responsive to 2-CdA showed markedly higher survival rates, compared to unresponsive patients.

The responder group showed an 83% survival rate at the 3- and 5-year mark, compared to rates of 63% and 22% in the non-responder group. The responder group showed an 81% clinical, histological and immunological response rates at the 2-year mark, compared to rates of 47% and 41% in the non-responder group. 16% of non-responsive patients progressed into EATL, and all of these patients died.

Because 2-CdA shows excellent clinical and histological response rates, and probably less frequent transition into EATL, it looks like a promising treatment for RCD II.

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4 Responses:

 
Clayton Secord
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
28 Mar 2011 9:03:21 AM PDT
Good article, but you do not mention anything about the accomplishments of Sidney Australia. They have develop some vaccination for celiac spruce disease.

 
Fernando A. Garza
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said this on
01 Apr 2011 7:41:34 AM PDT
I am not sure what the article is about. Who is type II.

 
Clayton Secord
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said this on
25 Jan 2014 4:24:55 PM PDT
Very nice article about celiac spruce and lymphomas.

 
Clayton Secord

said this on
25 Jan 2014 4:31:44 PM PDT
The article is good, but why did it not mention how some physicians argue that it is a mass with possible "carcinoid" which is not true.




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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hey All, I was wondering if anyone has tried gluten free pizza? I'm specifically talking about the store bought kind. I'm looking for a cheat meal - I've been eating mainly non processed fresh food but I need a little something to stay sane every now and then. I'm from New York so i'd say I have a pretty high standard of pizza lol. Are there any good frozen ones that are worth eating? I don't think i've ever eaten a frozen pizza in my life but I don't particularly have the time right now to make my own. Also while I'm posting I figure i'll ask. I'm going to this event with my friend at her work. It's like a dinner party. How do I navigate this situation food wise? Should I just eat at home and get drinks there or plan to eat there but take snacks just in case nothing seems safe? Thanks guys!

Hi Dalek, JMG has it right, any food with wheat, rye or barley is a gluten containing food. In addition, watch out for malt, which is sometimes made from barley. That includes the malt in beers.

Interesting!! I'm going to share that with her dr. I'll have to look into the gluten sensitivity more myself, the main reason we started testing is due to poor growth. As I learned more, I've seen several symptoms that could be explained by celiac. I like feeling informed so I'll know what to talk to the dr about or ask about. I think those are the results we are waiting for still, I couldn't remember the name.

Call your doctor's office and ask them to relay your request to the doctor to amend the test request, they should be able to sort it without an additional meeting and delay. Worth a try anyway I think the Biocard tests TTG IGA and it may give you an indication. Do post your results here as I'm sure others will be interested in its effectiveness. If it's negative however remember that there are several celiac tests for a reason. Some test on one, some on another etc... However my guess is your doctor will dismiss them and want their own testing. That's the usual experience.

Waiting for the EMA, I bet. Keep advocating! this is interesting. If celiac disease is excluded, she might still have a gluten sensitivity. There just is not specific test for that. http://theglutensummittranscripts.s3.amazonaws.com/Dr_Umberto_Volta.pdf