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High Rates of Celiac Disease in Multiple Sclerosis Patients


New study shows high rates of CD in multiple sclerosis patients.

Celiac.com 04/15/2011 - Celiac disease is associated with various autoimmune and neurological diseases. A team of researchers recently completed a study on the prevalence of celiac disease in a prospective series of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients and their first-degree relatives.

The study team included Luis Rodrigo, Carlos Hernández-Lahoz, Dolores Fuentes, Noemí Alvarez, Antonio López-Vázquez, and Segundo González.

They are affiliated variously with the departments of Gastroenterology, Immunology Services and Neurology at the Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias (HUCA) in Oviedo, Spain.

For the study, the team analyzed the prevalence of serological, histological and genetic celiac disease markers in 72 MS patients and 126 of their first-degree relatives. They then compared their results with data from 123 healthy control subjects.

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The results showed 7 MS patients (10%) with positive screens for tissue IgA-anti-transglutaminase-2 antibodies, compared with just 3 positive screens for healthy controls (2.4%) (p < 0.05). OR: 5.33 (CI-95%: 1.074-26.425).

The team found no difference in HLA-DQ2 markers between MS patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). The team found 8 MS patients (11.1%) with mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) in duodenal biopsies. Results also showed celiac disease in 23 of 126 first-degree relatives (32%).

The data showed several other associated diseases, especially dermatitis 41 (57%) and iron deficiency anemia in 28 (39%) MS patients.

MS patients also showed increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%).

The increased prevalence of celiac disease in MS patients and in their first-degree relatives suggests that early detection and dietary treatment of celiac disease in antibody-positive MS patients is advisable.

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5 Responses:

 
Krista
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said this on
15 Apr 2011 3:57:33 AM PDT
I wonder how many of those found relief from their MS symptoms once they went gluten free. I was thought to have MS for quite some time and it turned out what I actually had was gluten ataxia.

 
Jennifer
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said this on
18 Apr 2011 4:25:59 PM PDT
I had what I thought was the beginning of MS...my right arm/shoulder looked so skinny and atrophied...thankfully, my mom and dad (then I) were diagnosed and it was gluten sensitivity...not even full blown CD! I have muscle back in my arm and shoulder equal to my left side again.

 
Julie
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said this on
19 Apr 2011 9:28:14 AM PDT
Krista, I was as well, thought to have MS till a doctor was smart enough to test for celiac disease. I receive disability because of the episodic nature of having Gluten Ataxia. Because I wasn't diagnosed till I was 51, I probably am about recovered as I'll ever be. But accidental ingestion of gluten throws me back to the couch and using a can for short periods or a wheel chair. My brains are a mess.

 
Steve
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said this on
21 Apr 2011 4:02:07 AM PDT
I found this article very informative.

 
Eric
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said this on
02 Jan 2013 4:04:46 AM PDT
I agree totally: it is quite likely to be either a wrong diagnosis or could be MS, which includes gluten intolerance, among others. So for anyone reading this and looking for their own answers, please look further than just MS vs. celiac disease and gluten or not gluten. Have a google into Ashton Embry's work on MS diet.

An Elisa test, (York test in the UK), is the way to go to find out once your'e sure that you have something to find.




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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hey All, I was wondering if anyone has tried gluten free pizza? I'm specifically talking about the store bought kind. I'm looking for a cheat meal - I've been eating mainly non processed fresh food but I need a little something to stay sane every now and then. I'm from New York so i'd say I have a pretty high standard of pizza lol. Are there any good frozen ones that are worth eating? I don't think i've ever eaten a frozen pizza in my life but I don't particularly have the time right now to make my own. Also while I'm posting I figure i'll ask. I'm going to this event with my friend at her work. It's like a dinner party. How do I navigate this situation food wise? Should I just eat at home and get drinks there or plan to eat there but take snacks just in case nothing seems safe? Thanks guys!

Hi Dalek, JMG has it right, any food with wheat, rye or barley is a gluten containing food. In addition, watch out for malt, which is sometimes made from barley. That includes the malt in beers.

Interesting!! I'm going to share that with her dr. I'll have to look into the gluten sensitivity more myself, the main reason we started testing is due to poor growth. As I learned more, I've seen several symptoms that could be explained by celiac. I like feeling informed so I'll know what to talk to the dr about or ask about. I think those are the results we are waiting for still, I couldn't remember the name.

Call your doctor's office and ask them to relay your request to the doctor to amend the test request, they should be able to sort it without an additional meeting and delay. Worth a try anyway I think the Biocard tests TTG IGA and it may give you an indication. Do post your results here as I'm sure others will be interested in its effectiveness. If it's negative however remember that there are several celiac tests for a reason. Some test on one, some on another etc... However my guess is your doctor will dismiss them and want their own testing. That's the usual experience.

Waiting for the EMA, I bet. Keep advocating! this is interesting. If celiac disease is excluded, she might still have a gluten sensitivity. There just is not specific test for that. http://theglutensummittranscripts.s3.amazonaws.com/Dr_Umberto_Volta.pdf