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No Higher Infertility Rates for Men with Celiac Disease


New research on male infertility and celiac disease.

Celiac.com 04/20/2011 - To follow up on research suggesting that men with celiac disease have impaired sperm quality, a team of researchers recently set out to examine fertility in men with biopsy-verified celiac disease.

The research team included Daniela Zugna, Ph.D., Lorenzo Richiardi, M.D., Ph.D., Olof Akre, M.D., Ph.D., Olof Stephansson, M.D., Ph.D., and Jonas F. Ludvigsson, M.D., Ph.D.

The study included 7,121 men from a national Swedish population-based cohort. All of the men had celiac disease, as defined according to duodenal-jejunal biopsy data with the presence of Marsh III villous atrophy

The study followed men born between 1914 and 1990 until they turned 54, or until the study ended in 2008, whichever came first.

Using multinomial logistic regression and Cox regression,  the researchers calculated the number of children each man had fathered, and when those children were born relative to his celiac diagnosis. The team compared the estimated fertility of the study group against data from 31,677 age-matched reference male control subjects.

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Across the board, for every given time span, both before and after celiac disease diagnosis, men with celiac disease showed no higher rates of infertility. In fact, men with celiac disease fathered children at the same rate as these without, and showed similar rates for not fathering children.

At the end of the study, men with celiac disease had 9,935 children compared with 42,245 among controls. About 35 percent of men with and without celiac disease had no children.

Adjusting for age, time period, and parity and stratifying by education, men with biopsy-verified celiac disease showed an overall fertility hazard ratio of 1.02 (95% confidence interval, 0.99–1.04).

So, overall, this study found normal fertility rates in men with diagnosed celiac disease compared to those without.

Because the team studied only Swedish-born men still living in Sweden as adults, the authors note that the data may not apply to all men. However, the large study population makes the results more convincing.

It's important to remember that this study covers male fertility, and that several studies have shown that women with celiac disease do suffer reproductive and/or fertility issues at higher rates than women without celiac disease.

SOURCE:
Fertility and Sterility
Volume 95, Issue 5 , Pages 1709-1713.e3, April 2011
doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.01.132

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I have celiac and eosinaphalic esophagitis. I was put on a steroid inhaler recently. I use it like an inhaler but swallow the air instead of breathing it in. You may want to look into EOE and it's relationship to celiac. Just a thought. My swallowing and celiac seem to be related.

You have eat gluten every single day until after testing. And the celiac blood test is supposed to be done as well.

If I was the big guy, there's no way I would have to wait 3 and a half weeks for a test lol. My GI doc never recommended the antibody test. He said doing it with the scope was the only sure way to know. Does anybody know if I should eat a little gluten the day before my test to see if I will get an accurate enough test? Or will it not matter, once the damage is done it's done?

Unfortunately you need to keep eating gluten until all celiac testing is complete.

That explains EVERYTHING. I had Aetna PPO about 4 years ago, and it was horrible. Absolutely horrible, and expensive. They jacked up the price the year Obamacare came out, from $550 a month (family) to $725 a month and I got stuck paying it for a year. I dropped them like a rock when open season came around. They are a greedy and worthless insurance company.