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Iranian Study Finds Connection Between Helicobacter pylori and Celiac Disease


New research reveals connection between helicobacter pylori and celiac disease.

Celiac.com 04/25/2011 - Research shows that celiac disease is associated with numerous gastric abnormalities. An international research team recently set out to examine the association between rates of celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection in an Iranian population of 250 patients.

The research team included Mohammad Rostami Nejad BS1, Kamran Rostami MD PhD, Yoshio Yamaoka MD PhD, Reza Mashayekhi MD1, Mahsa Molaei MD, Hossein Dabiri PhD, David Al Dulaimi MD, Dariush Mirsattari MD, Homayoun Zojaji MD, Mohsen Norouzinia MD, and Mohammad Reza Zali MD FACG AGAF.

The team members are variously affiliated with the Research Institute of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Shahid Beheshti University, M.C., in Tehran, Iran, the School of Medicine, University of Birmingham in the UK, the Department of Medicine-Gastroenterology, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and the Department of Gastroenterology, Alexandra Hospital, Redditch, UK.

For the study, the team took topsides from the gastric antrum and duodenum. They assessed morphology and histology using the updated Sydney system and modified Marsh criteria, respectively.

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In order to simplify the assessment of gastric lesions, the team classified gastritis in both macroscopic and microscopic stages. They screened for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody to determine the presence of celiac disease.

Of the 250 patients, 232 (93%) showed histological evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection, while 24 patients (10%) showed histological abnormalities (Marsh I to IIIc). Of the 24 patients with histological abnormalities 20 (83%) showed Helicobacter pylori infection.

Of the total 250 patients, 25 patients (10%) showed positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody screens, nine (3.6%) of whom showed microscopic and macroscopic enteritis (Marsh I to IIIc).

Clinically, there was no way to distinguish the presentation of celiac disease from those cases infected with Helicobacter pylori. Histology, even in patients with positive antibody screens, was non-specific and not useful.

The results also showed a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis in the study group. However, neither was associated with celiac disease, but rather, matched average rates in Western population studies.

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1 Response:

 
Kit Kellison
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said this on
02 May 2011 2:29:48 PM PDT
This shows a correlation between people who are going in for treatment at a gastroenterology clinic and HB as well as the prevalence of celiac disease in these people.




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Hi Allie and welcome First off, I know 3 years was a long wait, but at 17 you've figured out celiac way before many people do. That should make a big impact on minimising its effects and helping you with the diet, so, bizarrely enough, congratulations! A lot of good advice has been brought together in this thread: Don't worry that your symptoms are bad now. As you follow the diet your body will begin healing itself and you're still very young so hopefully this will go really smoothly. Think in terms of the next 6 months rather than weeks however, recovery will likely take a little time. Eat as healthily as you can, lots of whole foods and try to avoid the gluten free processed substitutes as your digestive system needs all the help it can get at this moment. You may want to avoid dairy as well for now and think about reintroducing it later. This site has been really helpful to me and others. I hope you find it just as useful. Best of luck! ps, your increased reaction to gluten during the challenge phase was perfectly normal. Many find that reintroducing it much worse than the initial affects and take some time to get over the challenge. That's why you'll see lots of posts here urging folks to 'stay on gluten' till their testing is complete!

Hi! My daughter is 19 was diagnosed at age 16. It took about 12-18 month s for her to fully heal from the damage and feel "normal" again. Also because of the damage done she had reactions to dairy, so you may want to try no or minimum dairy until youre fully healed. Just a suggestion. Hope you start feeling well soon!

Hi yall! New to this blog, but really glad it exists because I have lots of questions. First off, I'm Allie! I'm 17 and newly diagnosed Celiac after about 3 years of searching for answers. I initially went gluten-free on the recommendation of a friend, I felt better in about a month and then my pediatric gastroenterologist had me do the gluten challenge, and my symptoms were the worst they have ever been, and ones I barely noticed before became very present. I did the biopsy and was diagnosed, it's been about 2 weeks and my symptoms are still pretty bad, although my diet has no known sources of gluten or cross contamination. Wondering if anyone has any input on healing post gluten challenge, any tips or how long it took for you would be quite helpful! Thanks

Might want to look into a keto diet, I have UC on top of celiacs and keto is working great Yeah I have major nerve and brain issues with gluten, gluten ataxia with nerve issues and brain issues. Seems to cause my body to attack my brain and nerve system. My brain stumbles fogs, and starts looping, the confusion causes me to become really irritable, I call it going Mr Hyde. Like my mind will start looping constantly on thoughts and not move driving me literally mad, or it used to. Now days it is primary the numbness anger but the gut issues and sometimes random motor loss limit me motionless to the floor now days for the duration of the major anger effects. Used to be a lot more mental then painful gut. I did a mental trauma post on it on while back where I came out about all my mental issues with gluten.

^^^^^^ good info, tips and tricks^^^^^^^^^ yes, crumbs will make you sick. also, breathing flour/pancake mix, etc that is in the air because eventually, you're going to swallow some.