22572 Does Delaying Gluten Exposure Lower the Rates of Islet Autoimmunity in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Risk? - Celiac.com
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Does Delaying Gluten Exposure Lower the Rates of Islet Autoimmunity in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Risk?


Celiac.com 06/08/2011 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether delaying gluten introduction in infants with genetic risk for islet autoimmunity is feasible, safe, and able to reduce the risk of type 1 diabetes–associated islet autoimmunity.

The research team included Sandra Hummel, PHD, Maren Pflüger, PHD, Michael Hummel, MD, Ezio Bonifacio, PHD, and Anette-G. Ziegler, MD.

They are variously affiliated with the Institute for Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Forschergruppe Diabetes der Technischen Universität München, the Institut für Diabetesforschung der Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V. am Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany, and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.

For the study, the team recruited a total of 150 infants with a first-degree family history of type 1 diabetes and a risk HLA genotype.

They then randomly assigned each infant to a first gluten exposure at age 6 months (control group) or 12 months (late-exposure group).

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The team followed-up on each infant at three month-intervals until the age of 3 years, and then yearly thereafter. The team tested for growth and autoantibodies to transglutaminase C [TGCAs]), islet autoantibodies to insulin, GAD, insulinoma-associated protein 2, and type 1 diabetes.

A total of 70% of families reported following the  dietary-intervention protocol. For the first three years, children in the control and late-exposure groups showed similar weight and height, along with similar probability of developing TGCAs (14 vs. 4%; P = 0.1).

A total of eleven children in the control group and 13 children in the late-exposure group developed islet autoantibodies (3-year risk: 12 vs. 13%; P = 0.6).

Seven children developed diabetes, including four in the late-exposure group. The team saw no significant differences when analyzing children as per protocol on the basis of the first reported reported gluten exposures for the children.

From the data, the team concluded that delaying gluten exposure until the age of 12 months is safe, but does not significantly reduce the likelihood of islet autoimmunity in genetically at-risk children.

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Francisca Mckinney
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said this on
17 Jun 2012 3:02:43 AM PDT
I am a sweet tooth and I intend to keep it that way. Apparently diabetes (type 2) runs within the family and I'm a target with my candy habits. Maybe there is a way I could try to stop diabetes without sacrificing sugar?




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I have 2 copies of DQ9. One from each parent.

Obviously from the outside it's difficult to comment, but if I were you I'd leave allergies for now and pursue definitive celiac testing via your doctor and preferably a gastroenterologist. They're the first port of call for digestion issues. If you do wind up being celiac it's possible that other allergies or intolerances would resolve or improve in any case once you've been on the diet for awhile. That's been my experience. Ps note that wheat allergy is completely different and unrelated to celiac or non celiac gluten sensitivity.

Thank you ps, it may be better if the thread title was changed as we now have two 'overwhelmed' topics. If it were 'Bile ducts and celiac?' then it may attract more users with direct experience?

Hello and welcome Maybe? From reading others accounts there's a big variation in how quickly gluten antibodies respond to the gluten diet. I did similar to you and my doctor said that 1 week back on should be enough to show up in a test, but he didn't know what he was talking about sadly... The 2 week figure refers to the endoscopy, for blood testing 8-12 weeks on gluten is more normal. Basically if it comes back positive fine you have your answer. If its negative it may be a false negative due to your going gluten free beforehand. If you want to pursue a diagnosis then yes. Don't go off gluten again until you confirm that all testing is complete. Keep a journal noting any symptoms, that may be useful to you later. More info here: There's some good info in the site faq: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ I know how you feel! Partway through my gluten challenge I knew that too results notwithstanding. Fwiw I think you've found your answer. Good luck!

Learn more about testing for celiac disease here: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ You do have to be on a gluten diet for ANY of the celiac tests (blood and biopsy) to work. While the endoscopy (with biopsies) can reveal villi damage, many other things besides celiac disease can cause villi damage too: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/what-else-can-cause-damage-to-the-small-intestine-other-than-celiac-disease/ So, both the blood test and endoscopy are usually ordered. There are some exceptions, but those are not common.