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Food Allergy, Intolerance Market to Hit $26 Billion by 2017

Celiac.com 09/01/2011 - The global market for food allergy and intolerance products will surpass $26 billion by 2017, according to the most recent projections from companiesandmarkets.com.

The retail growth in foods free of gluten, wheat, lactose, cow's milk, nuts, egg, soy and ominous additives has been driven in part by increased diagnosis of digestive health conditions, growing interest for gluten-free diets, better label regulations, and tastier products.

The United States is by far biggest market for food allergy and intolerance products. In the U.S., an estimated 10% of the population have difficulties digesting gluten.

In addition to their popularity with celiac-disease sufferers, gluten-free foods also appeal to a wide proportion of the general population, partly because of growing concerns related wheat consumption, and to symptoms associated with celiac disease.

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The Gluten-Free MallThe sector is also benefiting from numerous celebrities who have touted gluten-free and wheat-free diets as apart of a weight-loss and personal fitness routine.

Others are swayed by claims that going gluten-free can help treat disorders such as autism, chronic fatigue, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, multiple sclerosis, migraine and fertility problems.

At least partly in response to that fact, market for gluten-free products began to explode in 2010, with savory snacks, energy bars, baking products, chocolates, and cookies leading the way among new gluten-free products.

One result is that consumers now have a variety of options to choose from in the baked products category, including baking mixes, breads, bagels, muffins, entrees, cakes, cookies, doughnuts, baking mixes, pastas, pizza, cereals, snack foods and soups. This, in addition to a number of new gluten-free grains, starches, flours and seeds.

Online sites that specialize in delivering gluten-free and other specialty foods for for those with food allergies, such as The Gluten-free Mall have added upwards of a hundred new products and twenty new vendors a year, and expect those numbers to continue, according to its founder and CEO, Scott Adams.

The report includes comprehensive marketplace information, including analysis of key players, products, and strategic activities, trends, product launches, innovation, and regulatory issues, along with historic and forecast data covering 2003-2017.

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2 Responses:

 
Eugene Brogan
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said this on
05 Sep 2011 5:50:02 AM PDT
Good article.

 
Donnie
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said this on
05 Sep 2011 10:46:46 AM PDT
I have celiac and must avoid gluten. And unfortunately, I don't benefit from all the new gluten free food products on the market, and that will never change. The reason is, that I'm allergic to corn and sulfites, and gluten free food products are loaded with both of them. Food starches are bleached and processed with sulfites, and corn ingredients and corn derived additives are dumped into the US food supply. So I have to avoid most of the new gluten free products, as well as future ones that come on the market.




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