No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

More Hotel Restaurants Go Gluten-free

Celiac.com 09/23/2011 - In what looks to be a response to a surge in the demand for gluten-free dining experiences, hotel chains such as Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, Omni Hotels & Resorts and Ritz-Carlton Hotels are adjusting their menus and their kitchens to properly accommodate gluten-free guests.

Recent projections by industry tracker, Packaged Facts, suggest that gluten-free products will top $5 billion worldwide by 2015. Many savvy hoteliers see that trend to be influencing consumer expectation, and are attempting to position themselves for the future.

Photo: CC- Bob B. BrownSmart hoteliers and restaurateurs will also embrace the fact that reaping the benefits of the burgeoning demand for gluten-free eating means more than just serving gluten-free food. It means providing a complete, comprehensive service from product to preparation and delivery; from supply chain to the dining table.

For example, says Deborah Ceizler, director of marketing for the Celiac Disease Foundation, “...the contamination issue is the thing to watch for. You can serve hamburger with no bun, but if you’re using the same utensil to put a hamburger on a regular bun there’s [gluten] contamination.”

Offering a gluten-free meal means "more than just saying we have a gluten-free menu," she says. adding that, "[i]f you’re making a gluten-free pizza you have to make it in a different place, using different pans."

The gluten-free menu for the 65-seat Muse restaurant in the Ritz-Carlton Cleveland menu includes 11 appetizers and entrees. But, chef Constantine Vourliotis, says, “It’s not a gluten-free menu, it’s a menu that happens to be gluten-free."

Ads by Google:

Muse kitchen handles gluten-free orders “just like any allergy, when the ticket comes in off the machine, the issue is identified and we make sure there is an area free from the allergen. We set up a cutting board and whoever is able to take care of that guest’s needs owns the ticket, says Vourliotis.” They keep sanitation and soap buckets at each station, so the cooks are cleaning and sanitizing as they go.

Frederic Chartier, chef de cuisine at Fyve in the Ritz-Carlton Pentagon City, Arlington, VA, who is creating a guide for his staff that notes every item in the kitchen that contains gluten.

Other hotels or hotel chains to feature prominent gluten-free menus include:

  • Numerous hotels in the Ritz-Carlton chain introduced gluten-free menus in 2010.
  • Fairmont Hotels & Resorts, which partnered with a nutritionist and spent a year putting together a training program covering numerous dietary preferences, including diabetes, heart healthy, vegan, raw, macrobiotic and gluten-free.
  • Omni Hotels has announced plans to introduce a gluten-free breakfast buffet station across its chains. The station will include gluten-free cereals, granola, breads and muffins. Each station will have its own table and toaster to avoid cross-contamination with products containing wheat.
Stephen Rosenstock, senior vice president of food and beverage of Omni Hotels, recognizes the trend and its importance. “For a number of years, there’s been a growing recognition of people with gluten intolerance,” he says. Rosenstock points out the gluten-free options don’t cost hotels more money. It’s all about sourcing differently and planning for it.

Meanwhile, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts continues its industry-leading and comprehensive plan to field gluten-free food requests on a guest-by-guest basis across its vast array of dining establishments.

Instead of any one special menu, the company’s restaurants rely on their chefs to modify existing menu items into allergen-free items, including gluten-free. “Each guest who identifies themselves as having a food allergy is met by a chef or leader to discuss their individual needs,” say Gary Jones, Disney’s culinary dietary specialist.

The need to do so has been evolving since the early 1990s, says Jones. In 2010, the company served 440,000 guests with special dietary needs between Walt Disney World Resort and Disneyland Resort. That includes all allergies and intolerances, gluten among them.

“Our guests with food allergies deserve to have the same experiences provided to all our guests,” says Jones.

So, if these hotel and restaurant profiles offer any indication, it looks like the going will be a little easier for gluten-free folks on the move into the foreseeable future.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Darron
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
25 Sep 2011 8:45:32 AM PDT
I love to see this! We have found that staying in a hotel that has a real chef makes a huge difference. We will ask for a meeting with the chef and almost always we are very well taken care of during our stay.

 
Sandra
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
27 Sep 2011 4:01:29 PM PDT
So glad to hear that a few restaurants are taking the gluten situation seriously! I wish more quick food restaurants would do the same!




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hi! Um, please forgive my quirky sense of humor..... Celiac Disease is genetic... All first degree relatives of people diagnosed with Celiac Disease should be tested for the disease, too. Gall bladder problems are often associated with Celiac Disease. Your diagnosis might save your whole family from further medical problems as they age and the disease progresses... You need to set a good example if relatives are similarly diagnosed.... and then everybody will have to eat gluten free at family gatherings....

That's what I thought! My father has gluten sensitivity and I almost regret telling the doctor that because I feel that made her jump to conclusions because of that. He never had the biopsy either. I feel like doctors think it's just easier to say it's celiac when they show a gluten sensitivity to avoid additional testing, even if that diagnosis doesn't make any sense at all. My doctor didn't even offer the biopsy, and said the blood work was enough. Should I seek a third opinion? I mean, I've been gluten free for 9 months...

It will prolong your life....celiac is a autoimmune disease that causes your own immune system to attack you. The longer your eating gluten the worse it gets, I mean all kinds of other autoimmune disease, food allergies, food intolances. One day you could lose the ablity to eat carbs, or sugars, or become randomly allergic to tomatoes or corn all cause you decided not to be on road to healing I am not kidding here. I am allergic to corn, can not process meats, have another autoimmune disease that makes it so I can not eat dairy or CARBS/SUGARS. I wish I could go back in time and go on a gluten-free diet a decade ago. Worse that could happen you could develop cancer or other complications and yes we have had this happen to a member before on our forums. Think of it like this your just changing brand here I will give you some links to some gluten-free foods, and how to order them, You can even order alot of them online this should help simplify it for you. I suggest thrive, amazon, or one of hte other links from there, Many you can order from the manufacture. https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/

I know this is not funny for you guys, but I had to laugh about how all of those family members simply ignored your well meant advice. That is definitely head in the sand syndrome. I have tried for a long time to find the connection between autoimmune diseases and my health. With this celiac diagnosis I have finally found it. All of the puzzle pieces are in place for sure and it is going to be my mission to do the best possible in order to get healthy again. What a sneaky disease this is and to think that none of my family members never were diagnosed, despite the fact that both have been in doctor's care all of their lives. It really goes to show that most medical doctors simply seem to completely disconnect nutrition with health. I am scared to give that advice to people when I see them suffering from specific diseases. But there are people that I would like to help if I can. Scared to make those suggestions, because so many times negative reactions follow and all I meant to do was to help that person.

There are definitely things you can do to make it easier on yourself. But all of my ideas seem to cost money and involve cooking. But I'll give it a shot anyway in case you haven't already thought of it. I would buy a small chest freezer and put gluten-free foods in it. Canyon bakehouse sells their fantastic bread and bagels right on their website. You can just buy a case of it. Then if you ever get in the mood for a sandwich or bagel the bread's right there frozen in your chest freezer. If you get invited to somebody's house for dinner find out what their cooking and make your own similar version of it. So for Easter I would make ham, potatoes and broccoli and bring that with me. So when everybody else is eating a fantastic Easter dinner I'm also eating a fantastic Easter dinner. I have other food issues and before celiac I was invited to a friend's wedding. I wasn't going to be able to eat the food they were serving so I made similar food at home. They were serving lamb, ham, vegetables, potatoes. So I brought ham, corn and potatoes with me and heated it up when everybody was going to the buffet to get their food. So when everybody else was pigging out on this great wedding dinner I was also pigging out on a great dinner. And nobody would have noticed if they didn't try. Sometimes you just get in the mood to have a frozen dinner and just don't feel like cooking something. There's two ways you can go about this. I happen to be addicted to Udi's chicken Florentine and think that their broccoli kale lasagna is very good as well. So I'd stock up on that in that chest freezer. glutenfreemall.com has tons of stuff. On Sunday you can make a weeks worth of food and freeze a lot of it in individual portions. After a few weeks you will have several different meals in the chest freezer that you made at home. You can eat those on weeknights when you're too busy to cook. In my family Friday night was always eat out fast food night. McDonald's, Burger King, pizza, fried chicken. So for pizza my plan is to purchase Etalia New York style pizza crusts. Purchase some Escalon six in one crushed tomatoes and freeze in individual portions. Buy some Grande 50/50 mozzarella cheese and freeze in individual portions as well. If on Friday night if I am in the mood for pizza I'll just grab a crust, a portion of sauce and a portion of cheese from the chest freezer and make myself pizza in under 15 minutes. When I get invited to a barbecue I bring loaded potato skins or batter fried chicken wings. Everybody loves them as do I. I by Pamela's gluten-free flour from Amazon six at a time. So I always have some available. For the record, at the moment I am an extremely strict diet and cannot do any of the above. But will go back to that method in a few months.