22687 Overall Fertility Normal in Celiac Women, but Lower Last Two Years Before Diagnosis - Celiac.com
No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Overall Fertility Normal in Celiac Women, but Lower Last Two Years Before Diagnosis

Celiac.com 10/07/2011 - A number of studies suggest that women with celiac disease have reproductive difficulties, but data have been inconclusive and contradictory.

A research team recently set out to assess fertility in women with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The study team included Daniela Zugna, Lorenzo Richiardi, Olof Akre, Olof Stephansson, and Jonas F Ludvigsson.

Photo: CC- sean dreilingerThey are affiliated variously with the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the Centre for Experimental Research and Medical Studies and Centre for Oncologic Prevention at the University of Turin in Turin, Italy, the Department of Paediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, and with Clinical Epidemiology Unit of the Department of Medicine, the Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, the Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and the Department of Women's and Children's Health at the Karolinska Institutet in Karolinska, Sweden.

For their Swedish population-based cohort study, the team gathered data all 28 pathology departments in Sweden on 18,005 biopsy-proven duodenal/jejunal biopsy, using Marsh III, villous atrophy as their baseline.

They also established a control group of 51,109 age-matched women without celiac disease.

They then found 11,495 women with celiac disease who were aged 18–45 years.

The team used multinomial logistic regression and Cox regression to estimate fertility in these women compared with the age-matched reference women.

The team defined 'fertility' as the number of children according to the Swedish Multi-Generation Register.

Ads by Google:

Their results showed that women with celiac disease had 16,309 births compared with 69,245 for the reference group.

Overall, the total number of children in the group of women with celiac disease was slightly higher compared with the reference group.

Adjusting for age, calendar period and parity and stratifying by education, the overall fertility hazard ratio (HR) for women with celiac disease was 1.03 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.05).

Specifically, the fertility HR was 1.05 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.14) for celiac disease diagnosed in women under 18-years of age, 1.04 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.07) for celiac disease diagnosed in women between 18 and 45 years, and 1.02 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.04) for celiac disease diagnosed in women >45 years of age.

Factoring in the dates of celiac disease diagnosis, fertility was decreased 0–2 years before time of diagnosis (HR=0.63; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.70),

but was identical to that of controls 0–5 years subsequent to diagnosis and increased to 1.12 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.21) thereafter.

The data for this study show that women with celiac disease had a normal fertility, but their fertility was decreased in the last two years before diagnosis.

Interestingly, fertility in women with celiac disease was also slightly higher after five years, comported to the control group.

Stay tuned...

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

That's a great question to ask. Thanks for arming me with good ones. I'm doing my research to be able to stand my ground. Ironically, my endo. Was the most helpful doctor I'd seen and my GP has generally not seemed to have a clue. I have PCOS and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, when I moved to the area and saw him, he was resistant to refer me to an endocrinologist (before I moved to the area, I'd already been seeing an endo. For three years for follow ups since I'd been diagnosed.) My endo. Was able to treat the thyroid antibodies well, they went down without synthroid or surgery (which previous doctor's had suggested). However, I think she dropped the ball on the Celiac blood panel (which I think endos should Definitely be more aware of). And my GP seemed much more aware on this issue. I think the takeaway is always do your research, advocate for yourself, and let second opinions fill in the gaps in knowledge some on your care team may have. (But also, ditch them if they don't know what they're talking about) Also, I live in an area with a doctor shortage... Thanks for the welcome to the community!

?

Silk Cashew milk is pretty creamy and close to dairy milk, I love Macadamia milk, almond milk is a tad thin in most brands but a good sub and normally enriched with calcium, vitamin D and E. Coconut milk is a bit acquired and can range greatly in consistency, rice milk is normally very thin like 2% school carton milk and bland. Elmhurst Harvest has started making SUPER rich and creamy milks with walnuts, almond, and macadamia nuts, with talk of bringing back the pistachio milk. I personally love the almond and cashew blends from blue diamond or silk. If you need a nut free version Good Karma makes a decent flax milk. There are a few other brands out there that make some good ones here locally I love the HEB Organics almond milk best almond milk I have ever tasted rich, fulfilling, and just perfect. NOTE, avoid the shelf stable versions from almond dream, cashew dream, blue diamond, silk, HEB they are normally much thinner and bland. Cheese, On block cheeses Dayia makes a good Havarti, smoked Gouda, and cheddar. the shreds from there are pretty bad in taste. Follow your Heart makes a great provolone and decent on everything else. Lisanatti makes godly good shreds for jalapeno jack, cheddar, and mozzarella, they melt better then real cheese as they lack the greasy oil mess. Their blocks on the other hand are way to soft. Julian Bakery makes a passable mozzarella but only if your melting it over something or in something the flavor and texture is off but it is the only cheese I found you can order on amazon lol. Kite Hill makes some really good soft cheeses, I tried a few others like hedei ho and found they are too salty or the flavor way to off to even call cheese. Ice cream there is Nada Moo, and So delicious for some of the top dairy free ones. I personally can only have one called wink which is a unsweetened one. Yogurt the So delicious and kite hill take the top in my opinion but they are the only ones that make a good unsweetened so I can not comment on others. I make my own parmesan and cheese sauces from scratch myself from various ingredients. Even make my own cheddar biscuits and cheesy garlic breads. Hell just made a batch of cheesy cheddar and chive biscuits this morning, OHH the buttery goodness of Nutiva Butter flavored coconut oil I love cooking with, sauteing, and using in savory foods. last week I found it was great with carb free noodles and herb seasoning. I am thinking of using it in my cauliflower Alfredo sauce next time also.

From what I've read 2 slices a day should be enough for the challenge. I think they'll have more gluten than the milky way's. Now I want a milky way Have one for me tomorrow dalek100!

Did you ever figure out what corn gluten is in? I can not find any information