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Roasted Artichokes and Broccoli (Gluten-Free)

I find baby artichokes a little underrated; they’re easier to handle and usually cheaper. I tried these for the first time on the grill, but it’s just as easy to toss together and roast. I happened to have pistachios on hand the second time around and they turned out to be the secret star of this dish.

The finished roasted artichokes and broccoli. Photo: CC--Laurel FanIngredients:
9-10 baby artichokes, about 2 pounds
1 broccoli head, cut into florets
1 lemon, cut in half, plus 1 teaspoon zest
¼ cup shelled pistachio nuts
2 cloves garlic, minced
¼ cup olive oil plus 1 teaspoon
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
¼ cup parmesan cheese, freshly grated
½ teaspoon each salt and pepper

Directions:
Preheat oven to 400º F.

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Cut off the top third of the artichokes and peel outer layers away. Trim the stems remove the outer layer with a vegetable peeler. Cut down the middle and rub with lemons to keep from browning. Arrange broccoli and artichokes, cut-side up, in a roasting pan.

In a small bowl, whisk together ¼ cup olive oil, garlic, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper. Drizzle over vegetables and roast for 20 minutes, or until artichokes are tender.

In the meantime, heat the remaining teaspoon of olive oil in a small pan. Add pistachios and lemon zest and toast for about 2 minutes.

Top vegetables with cheese and pistachios and serve.

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1 Response:

 
Susie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
08 Nov 2011 3:41:37 AM PDT
I don't have to try this to know it will be delicious, it will. Thanks for the recipe.




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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

I've given up on all those processed gluten free foods out there and have stuck to eating a whole foods diet. I have noticed such a huge, massive, difference in my energy, mood, sleep, and well being. Needless to say I've been doing a lot of cooking but have been leaving sugar out because I don't know the safe brands. I tried using Stevia in the raw but keep getting horrible headaches when I use it. I saw that the first ingredient is Dextrose so it's not "raw". Anyway, what are the safe brands out there as far as white and brown sugars go? I made saurkraut and pork chops last night and would've loved potato salad. Also while I'm on here, what about Mayo? What's safe? I saw Sir Kennsington was gluten-free Certified.

My Celiac disease presented as yours did: anemia, unexplained weight loss, aches and pains (due to vitamin and mineral deficiencies from malabsorption), the abdominal burning (whether I ate or not), decreased appetite, itching, the works. Plus I had a mood like a gorgon, which wasn't helped by my friends telling me "how slender!" I looked. My bones were basically all that was holding me up. I've had the blood panel too, which has proven very informative. I had a follow-up celiac panel after I'd been on the diet for over a year and it showed the diet was working. I also went through an anger phase because my (now former) doc (who is also my dad's doc and knows he has celiac AND knows we're related...) just wrote me a prescription for antidepressants, whereas I might have been spared years of feeling crappy (my late 30s!) if he'd just ordered a CBC and found the anemia. I'm a woman and I feel like sometimes whatever you say to a doc (even female docs!), all they hear is "psych symptoms". It really made me mad. But I've always pooped like a champ so I didn't exactly have typical symptoms either. Then I thought about how long it took my poor dad to get diagnosed (decades), which was before there was all this awareness, and I feel grateful for the fact that it took comparatively far less time for me to get my diagnosis and start feeling better. Don't worry about not finding stuff you like to eat: since gluten-free has become "the new thing" there are so many choices and the price has come down considerably since my dad got diagnosed (over 12 years ago). If your doc confirms celiac, then you'll be back on the (albeit gluten-free!) mac and cheese in no time, this time actually absorbing some of the mac and cheesy goodness! Feel better and take care.

If you are worried about your glycemic levels, then you should test with a glucose meter. I have diabetes (insulin resistance/TD2) and rice and potatoes spike me like crazy! I might as well consume ice cream! But if you do not have diabetes, no worries!

Thanks to both of you for your replies. I wasn't so much concerned about the arsenic (although that is an additional consideration) as I was about the glycemic level. I don't bake enough to make blending my own flour blends worthwhile, so I will definitely check out the links you provided, Ennis_TX. So far I'm tolerating oats and my gastro doc says I can keep eating them as long as they're certified GT. I just looked at some crackers I have for hummus and noticed their main ingredient is rice. I should probably just eat the hummus with veggies!

I agree with Ennis. It sounds like she is getting access to gluten way too often to expect healing. I had some pretty severe patches of intestinal damage when I was diagnosed. Anemia was my symptom and I had no gut issues then. So, just because she injests gluten and does not have some major symptoms right away, does not mean she is not building up antibodies. Have those antibodies been re-tested to see if they are in the normal ranges now? Missing patches of damage in the small intestine is possible. Heck, the small intestine is the size of a tennis court (goggle it). So easy to miss. Also, your GI should have taken more than four samples? How many were taken? (Forgive me, if I have forgotten.) Cross contamination in your house is real, especially if you have kids in the house. Member Jebby, a preemie doctor who has celiac disease, was not getting well. Turns out her four small and adorable children were glutening her. She made her house gluten free. Just something to consider. You mentioned she had access to gluten at a party. So, does that mean she caves in and eats it? She needs to become a stakeholder in this diet.