No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Celiac Disease: Vitamin D and K Levels Influence Bone Mineral Density in Children and Teens



Celiac.com 11/07/2011 - Fat-soluble vitamin malabsorption, inflammation and/or under-nutrition put children with celiac disease at risk for decreased bone mineral density.

A research team recently set out to determine how vitamin D and K might influence bone mineral density and bone growth in children and adolescents with celiac disease. The study team included D. R. Mager, J. Qiao, and J. Turner.

The team's goal was to examine the interrelationships between vitamin K/D levels and lifestyle factors on bone mass density in children and adolescents with celiac disease at diagnosis and after 1 year on the gluten-free diet.

The team studied children and adolescents aged 3–17 years with biopsy proven celiac disease at diagnosis and after 1 year on the gluten-free diet.

To measure bone mineral density the researchers used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, factoring in relevant variables including anthropometrics, vitamin D/K status, diet, physical activity and sun exposure.

Ads by Google:

The children saw their lowest BMD-z scores for whole-body and lumbar-spine (−1) at diagnosis (10–20%) and after 1 year (30–32%), independent of symptoms.

Older children (>10 years) showed substantially lower BMD-z scores for whole-body (−0.55±0.7 versus 0.72±1.5) and serum levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (90.3±24.8 versus 70.5±19.8 nmol/l) 
as compared with younger children (10 years) (P<0.001).

Overall, forty-three percent showed suboptimal vitamin D status (25(OH)-vitamin D <75 nmol/l) at diagnosis. Nearly half of these vitamin D deficiencies corrected after 1 year on the gluten-free diet.

Also, twenty-five percent of the children showed suboptimal vitamin K status at diagnosis. All vitamin K deficiencies resolved after 1 year.

Both children and adolescents with celiac disease face a substantial risk for suboptimal bone health at time of diagnosis and up to 1 year after adopting a gluten-free diet. This higher risk is likely due in part to suboptimal vitamin D/K levels.

Children and teens with celiac disease may benefit from treatment regimens that promote optimal vitamin K/D intake.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Wilmer
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
17 Sep 2012 10:02:45 AM PDT
Excessive nutrition info on the internet! How to choose the right diet?




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Why not give up supplements for a while? Not everyone is deficient in vitamins and minerals -- or at least dangerously so. Ask your doctor to check. I take no supplements. My doctor runs a vitamin panel at my yearly check-up. I do make sure my diet is healthy and varied -- like eating vegg...

So to repeat, you will have to do a gluten challenge which is 12 weeks of eating 1 slice of bread per day for the blood tests or 2 weeks of gluten eating for an endoscopy.

I'm celiac for less than 3 months. I'm starting to get concern about getting all the necessary vitamins being gluten free. Recently my joint pain has increased, pulsating pain in my head, and sore areas in legs and neck have started recently. Or course, anxiety too. I'm currently taking...

As far as the grey hair goes, I understand how you feel as I started going seriously grey in my mid 20's also. As cyclinglady stated, there is nothing you can do about that except color you hair or live with the grey hair. I chose to color it. Grey hair is generally either a genetic thing or it...

Lotions used topically are not a concern at all unless they contain gluten and you ingest them into your mouth. Gluten has to get into your GI tract, (which begins in your mouth) for damage to occur. Ditto for hair care products. As most salons have you bend your head back into a sink to wash,...