22747 Hail Merry's Gluten-Free Blonde Macaroons - Celiac.com
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Hail Merry's Gluten-Free Blonde Macaroons

I was very surprised when I received a care package of Hail Merry's gluten-free blonde macaroons.  I absolutely love coconut and have always had bit of a sweet tooth, but in the past I haven't always had the best of luck with gluten-free macaroons.  Usually, I find macaroons to be way too sweet, high in fat and calories or the texture is just wrong.  Despite the charming packaging that contained these macaroons, I still had my doubts – but who am I kidding?  I love coconut! 

Hail Merry's Gluten-Free Blonde MacaroonsWhen I took my first bite I noticed that the texture of these macaroons was soft, slightly chewy, but not overly sweet – I guess they read my mind about my usual complaints about most macaroons – they tasted great.  I found the size of each macaroon (just short of the size of a golf ball) was just the perfect size to get satisfaction for a sweet tooth like me, but the best part is that they only have 70 calories and 5.5 grams of fat each!  How can this be? 

Upon further reading of their packaging I noticed that Hail Merry didn't cut any corners when they developed these little bites of goodness!  The ingredient list is short , wholesome and surprisingly these macaroons are not only raw and vegan, but are only lightly sweetened with maple syrup.  I must also mention that shredded coconut has twice the fiber of oats, and that coconut oil is known to contribute to healthier hair, skin and can help aid proper digestion. 

I absolutely loved the taste of these macaroons with their real coconut flavor and texture!  These macaroons give a "junk food" taste with the quality and nutrition that you wouldn't expect from such a nice little treat – in my book they are definitely worth trying!

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I know this post is a year ago... however it is still on the first page of the travel section! I am from Uruguay, (South America) and I can answer this question for people that may look at it in the future. As a South American - I can say that the cuisine varies greatly. In cities, you shouldn't have any more than the normal amount of difficulty finding food. For example, in Montevideo, the city I am from, you'll have no problem finding dedicated entire Celiac stores. Meat is a large part of restaurant menus, so parilladas (similar in theory to steakhouses, would be very easy to navigate). Uruguayans do eat a lot of pastries, and just like in the states... Most mainstream bakeries are not gluten free, but like I mentioned there are places that specialize. In Uruguay, there is knowledge of Celiac and a large health awareness. Some of the foods can be costly, cost of living in general is not low. In large swaths of South America, the foods you mentioned - Potatoes, rice, meat, etc are abundant, as are fresh fruits and veggies. Avoiding corn does make it tricky. Peru can be a great place for non-gluten eaters. Peru uses very little gluten (they are the original quinoa eaters) but there is a lot of corn in the diet (and since you are corn sensitive, that would be a food you would need to navigate). Latin America spread over two continents! In this area you will find a great variety in cultures, cuisines, and knowledge of celiac. There is no reason why If you want to experience Latin America, that you have to rule out an entire region of the world because of Celiac. Navigating it will be different, but it is doable!

Recently diagnosed last week does the pain ever get better??

George, i am sorry that you are not feeling well! ?? I am not a doctor, but just trying out drugs to stop your symptoms just seems like a band aid approach. It sounds like he suspects IBS which is really, in my opinion, "I be stumped". Has inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD) (more lovely autoimmune disorders) been ruled out? This includes both Crohn's and Colitis. My niece was diagnosed with Crohn's finally with a pill camera after all other tests were given. The damage was not within reach of any scope. I am just throwing out suggestions. Hopefully, you and your doctor will figure it out soon!

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