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Rifaximin Does Not Relieve Persistent Celiac Disease Symptoms

Celiac.com 12/27/2011 - Non-controlled studies suggest that Rifaximin may improve celiac disease symptoms in such cases. However, up to now, no controlled trials have been conducted.

Photo: CC - spec-ta-clesA team of researchers used a double-blind clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of rifaximin in relieving gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with poorly responsive celiac disease. They also assessed the effects of rifaximin on lactulose-hydrogen breath tests in those patients.

The research team included Matthew S. Chang, Maria T. Minaya, Jianfeng Cheng, Bradley A. Connor, Suzanne K. Lewis, and Peter H. R. Green.

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is one of the main reasons that certain people with celiac disease fail to respond well to a gluten-free diet, and why they often suffer persistent symptoms.

To make their assessment, the team designed a single-center, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease and persistent gastrointestinal symptoms despite following a gluten-free diet.

For the trial, the team 25 randomly assigned patients received a placebo, while the other 25 received rifaximin (n = 25) 1,200 mg daily for 10 days.

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For each patient, the team then used the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and administered lactulose-hydrogen breath tests at weeks 0, 2, and 12.

The team defined an abnormal breath test as showing either: (1) a rise in hydrogen of C20 parts per million (ppm) within 100 min, or (2) two peaks C20 ppm over baseline.

They found that rifaximin had no effect on GSRS scores, regardless of baseline breath tests.

Using a multivariable regression model, they found that the length of a patient's gastrointestinal symptoms significantly predicted overall GSRS scores (estimate 0.029, p.006).

According to criteria 1 and 2, respectively, SIBO was present in 55 and 8% of patients at baseline, intermittently present in 28 and 20% given placebo, and 28 and 12% given rifaximin.

Results showed no difference SIBO rates between placebo and treatment groups at weeks 2 and 12.

From their study, the team concludes that rifaximin does not improve gastrointestinal symptoms, and that hydrogen breath tests do not reliably show which patients will respond favorably to antibiotic therapy.

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2 Responses:

 
Kristin Jordan
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said this on
02 Jan 2012 12:21:01 PM PDT
Nice to see that studies confirm my personal experience! A course of Rifaximin did nothing to improve my GI symptoms; in fact, it made my symptoms worse.

 
annie
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said this on
05 Apr 2012 4:03:52 PM PDT
Kristin~ How did you started in getting tested for celiac disease? I just turned 27 and do not have insurance, but have been gluten free for 7 months now but I noticed that my symptoms and starting up again even when I do not eat gluten. I would like to join some kind of study to figure this out since it is really starting to take a big toll on me and my body.




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