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Celiac.com Podcast Edition - Episode 46 - Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet News

Celiac.com 12/31/2011 - Welcome To Celiac.com Podcast Edition!

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Next time just take a box of rat poisoning and extract ONE granule. Toss it into his food (while he is watching) and give it a good stir. Hand the food over and see if he is willing to eat it.

Gertrude.....just a few comments after reading your posts..........no other disease but Celiac disease will cause a positive on the EMA test. I have never heard of a false positive on that either. It is a test that is done by hand and not by a machine because of the way it has to be done, so having a false positive is almost impossible. Your doctor should have known that. Many people trip just 1 or 2 tests on the panel and they have Celiac Disease. With autoimmune testing, you can test 2 different people with Celiac Disease and they can have wildly different test results. Couple those with a positive gene test and the likelihood of it being Celiac is almost 100%. The fact that the doc didn't find villus atrophy just means the damage is not extensive enough for them to find.......yet. I am sure they would prefer you to keep eating gluten until that happens but you do not want to do that. So.........after you have been gluten-free for awhile, have them run the Celiac panel again to see if your EMA goes to normal, which it should if you eat very gluten free. With positive gene results, positives on your Celiac antibody testing, and positive dietary response, that is a diagnosis!

That's great, Gertrude! I'm glad your doctors sound more competent than mine. And that you're starting to feel better. I haven't had any abdominal or joint pain in the last few days, and I feel like I have more energy for sure. I've been feeling a little off/dizzy but that might be from gluten withdrawal. Good luck with everything!

By the way, I got my biopsy pathology report and the doctor took 2 biopsies, not the recommended 4-6. It says no "significant villous blunting not seen." I don't know if I should laugh or cry---so frustrating.

Thank you, this does feel helpful and reassuring. Did you end up getting blood tests again after going gluten-free? Do you have to worry about cross contamination as much as with a celiac diagnosis? How do you explain it to friends and family? Non-Celiac gluten sensitivity sounds so vague and I know it's dumb, but I worry about people not taking me seriously.