No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Dense Genotyping Pinpoints Numerous Common and Rare Variant Association Signals in Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 02/22/2012 - A research team recently conducted a dense genotyping non-HLA risk loci previously associated with immune-mediated diseases in individuals with celiac disease. The study was conducted under the auspices of the Genetics Department, University Medical Center and University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Photo: CC-Bogdan SudituThe team used variants from the 1000 Genomes Project pilot European CEU dataset, along with data from additional re-sequencing studies, to densely genotype a total of 183 non-HLA risk loci previously associated with immune-mediated diseases in 12,041 individuals with celiac disease and in 12,228 control subjects.

They were able to discover thirteen new celiac disease risk loci reaching genome-wide significance. This discovery brings the number of loci known to be associated with celiac disease, including the HLA locus, to forty.

The team found multiple independent association signals in more than one in three of the loci. This is likely due to a combination of common, low-frequency and rare genetic variants.

Ads by Google:

Compared to earlier data, such as those from HapMap3, the large study group and the dense gene mapping made for a much higher resolution of the pattern of linkage disequilibrium and suggested localization of many signals to finer scale regions.

In all, the team found that 29 of the 54 fine-mapped signals seemed to be localized to single genes and, in some instances, to gene regulatory elements.

Finally, they defined the complex genetic architecture of the risk regions of celiac disease. They also refined the risk signals for celiac disease, which provide support for the next steps in understanding its causes.

The research team included G. Trynka, K. A. Hunt, N. A. Bockett, J. Romanos, V. Mistry, A. Szperl, S. F. Bakker, M. T. Bardella, L. Bhaw-Rosun, G. Castillejo, E. G. de la Concha, R. C. de Almeida, K. R. Dias, C. C. van Diemen, P.C. Dubois, R. H. Duerr, S. Edkins, L. Franke, K. Fransen, J. Gutierrez, G. A. Heap, B. Hrdlickova, S. Hunt, L. P. Izurieta, V. Izzo, L. A. Joosten, C. Langford, M. C. Mazzilli, C. A. Mein, V. Midah, M. Mitrovic, B. Mora, M. Morelli, S. Nutland, C. Núñez, S. Onengut-Gumuscu, K. Pearce, M. Platteel, I. Polanco, S. Potter, C. Ribes-Koninckx, I. Ricaño-Ponce, S. S. Rich, A. Rybak, J. L. Santiago, S. Senapati, A. Sood, H. Szajewska, R. Troncone, J. Varadé, C. Wallace, V. M. Wolters, and A. Zhernakova. The study team also included B. K. Thelma, B. Cukrowska, E. Urcelay, J. R. Bilbao, M. L. Mearin, D. Barisani, J. C. Barrett, V. Plagnol, P. Deloukas, C. Wijmenga, and D. A. van Heel, who are variously affiliated with the Spanish Consortium on the Genetics of Coeliac Disease (CEGEC), the PreventCD Study Group, and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC).

Source:


Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


I had 23andme testing which showed I have genes DQ2.5 and DQ8. When I learned this I decided to stop eating gluten to PREVENT getting celiac, but didn't worry about cross-contamination. A year later I got sick, and eventually had an endoscopy which showed Marsh 1. My blood tests were negative, as...

The beginning of your story sounds very much like mine. I stopped eating gluten regularly when I adopted a mostly paleo diet years ago (bonus: my lifelong canker sores disappeared!). When I got 23andme testing done and learned I have both high-risk celiac genes, I stopped eating gluten altogether...

File not found.

We do not have gluten in my home other then the bread he Uses to make school lunch sandwiches. however I am divorced so he spends a good part of the week at his dad's as well where he can eat whatever he wants. My son is a terrible eater and has been very picky since he was 2 years old, he's no...

S. If this was the cause of celiac disease, the gluten-free diet would be useless, because people 25 Feb 2015 Fish exposed to glyphosate develop ... View the full article