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Contribution of Celiac Disease Autoantibodies to the Disease Process

Celiac.com 05/28/2012 - Two researchers recently conducted an assessment of the contribution of celiac disease autoantibodies to the disease process.

Photo: CC - Argonne National LaboratoryThe researchers were Katri Lindfors, of the Pediatric Research Center, University of Tampere & Tampere University Hospital and Katri Kaukinen, affiliated with both the School of Medicine, at the University of Tampere, and the Department of Gastroenterology & Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, both in Tampere, Finland.

The protein transglutaminase 2 is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in cellular adhesion.

Moreover, transglutaminase 2 has been identified as the auto-antigen in celiac disease, and in untreated celiac disease. In addition to being present in the serum, the transglutaminase 2-targeted autoantibodies are bound to their antigen in the basement membrane underlining the small-bowel mucosal epithelium.

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Furthermore, studies have shown that disease-specific transglutaminase 2-targeted autoantibodies have a range of biological effects on different cell types.

By using Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells, Lindfors and Kaukinen show that serum transglutaminase 2-targeted autoantibodies from untreated celiac patients inhibit the adhesion of these cells.

These results offer an important direction for future research to improve the basic understanding of celiac disease pathogenesis, and especially how disease-specific autoantibodies function as the disease progresses.

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1 Response:

 
JERRY WELCH
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said this on
05 Jun 2012 4:26:33 PM PDT
Very interesting as I have celiac and I'm on a gluten free diet. My wife is well read but we are at a loss to find a doctor that is knolageable enough to really help us.




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Last December, I was horribly sick. Suddenly, questioning gluten; I didn't eat any. The change was beyond enormous, and I could not ever bring myself to voluntarily eat it, again. It was as if I was finally, not being electrocuted! A nasty, blistering rash went away, at the same time. Now, I am ...

Same here. Our doctor told us that my daughter does not have celiac right after the endoscopy. We were overjoyed. 2 weeks later, they called and gave us the test results, and that she does have celiac. I would wait at least until the actual results before worry about next steps.

Peanut butter is always my breakfast when I want to stay full for a while. When I am in a rush, I just eat a spoon of peanut butter and a glass of milk with some fruit. When I have a bit more time, I make toast with peanut butter. Cereal doesn't keep me full in general. I know you said you ...

My GI said the same thing, but he warned me that we would have to wait for the pathologist's report. Guess what? The report showed moderate to severe patches of intestinal damage. So, hang in there and just wait for those results.

What sort of side effects did you have? I feel like I still have acid every morning, upset stomach, bloating, burping, and poor tolerance to most food.