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Bone Mineral Density Directly Tied to Duodenal Marsh Stage in Newly Diagnosed Adult Celiac Patients

Celiac.com 07/12/2012 - A research team affiliated with the Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition at Complejo Hospitalario Mancha Centro in Alcázar de San Juan, Spain, recently set out to study how bone mineral density correlates with duodenal Marsh stage in newly diagnosed adult celiac patients. The team made up of A. García-Manzanares, J.M. Tenias, and A.J. Lucendo.

Photo: CC--Gonzo CharlesFor their study, the researchers wanted to estimate the rates of low bone mineral density (BMD) in adult celiac patients and to better understand nutritional and metabolic factors associated with osteoporosis and osteopenia.

To do so, they recruited patients a consecutive group of 40 adults (36 females/4 males), between the ages of 18 and 68, who were newly diagnosed with celiac disease. Average patient age was 44.25 years.

For each patient, the researchers conducted bone density scans on the left hip and lumbar spine using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. They also assessed nutritional parameters and conducted a hormone study to exclude secondary low BMD.

Overall, at diagnosis 45% of patients showed low BMD at both hip and lumbar spine. Risk of hip fracture was generally low, but climbed into the mild range for patients with villous atrophy (p = 0.011).

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The team also found that major fracture risk varied according to Marsh stage (p = 0.015). They found significant differences in nutritional status between patients with and without duodenal villous atrophy. Marsh III stage patients showed substantially reduced body mass index and blood levels of pre-albumin, iron, vitamin D and folic acid.

The team found no differences found in blood hormone levels between Marsh stages or BMDs.

They found that the amount of bone mass loss in the lumbar spine was directly tied to Marsh stage. They found a parallel association between BMD and Marsh stage in the hip, but this was not statistically significant.

Overall, results showed that duodenal villous atrophy, through malabsorption, was the main factor for low BMD in patients with adult-onset celiac disease.

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1 Response:

 
jill sacherman
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said this on
16 Jul 2012 11:37:57 AM PDT
I am glad to be made aware about current knowledge of celiac disease's effects, although I do wish I knew more about what I could do to improve it.




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I've been seeing my dr for a few weeks now about my stomach issues. We've ruled out the gallbladder and h-pylori and today I had the celiac blood tests done. From the reading I've done the past two days, it seems to me that it's highly likely that I have it. I've had digestive issues for years, but they've gotten progressively worse over the past 6 months or so. Pain and nausea when eating, bloat, eternal constipation, dh rash, at it's worse, tight cramp-like pain in a fist under my sternum, radiating through my back and around my right side keeping me up at night. Also heartburn/reflux and trouble swallowing, etc. Anyway, about 2 months ago, I needed a change. I didn't go to the dr immediately because it seemed pointless. (I've mentioned stomach ache when eating to drs before and been blown off.) So, I started the Whole30 elimination diet (takes out soy, grains, dairy, peanuts, and leaves you basically eating meat & veggies). Figured it would show me what I needed to take out of my diet and hopefully feel better. It worked- I felt great! And it seems that grains and gluten are my biggest offenders. But, now I've been off gluten prior to celiac testing. It's been 7 weeks. After 4 weeks I tested steal cut oats, that I later found out were probably glutened. And then nothing until yesterday. Yesterday I had 2 pieces of bread and a muffin and today I had two pieces of bread and then the blood test. Is this going to be enough to show up on the tests? My dr said that it would probably show up, since I had some yesterday and today and was currently having symptoms. But, google seems to say that I should be glutened for 2 wks straight before testing. Has anyone tested positive after just a little gluten? If it's negative should I insist on doing it again after weeks back on gluten? I feel awful, but do want clear answers. Obviously, gluten's not going to be a part of my life any more either way.

So just to clarify had not consumed any gluten for about 4 days before testing. I was assured by my allergist that it wouldn't affect the test. But what was alarming was that she retested my food allergies (my most recent reaction was two weeks ago) and every food allergy I have came back negative. I don't understand how that is possible. These food allergies developed when I was 20 and I am almost 24 now.

Thanks! You too! I have learned from this experience to take charge of my own health. It's nice at least that we can try the gluten-free treatment without a firm diagnosis or a doctor confirming the disease. I've also felt some of the gluten withdrawal symptoms, and my stomach pain ebbs and flows, but I'm determined to stick with the gluten-free diet to see what a difference it makes. Gemini, thank you! This was really validating and useful for me to hear. I've felt so confused through this process and just want some answers. If the biopsy results do come back negative, I'm going to follow your advice and do the gluten-free diet with repeat blood testing after a while. If they come back positive, well, then I'll have my answer. I'm supposed to get them back next week.

I have celiac and eosinaphalic esophagitis. I was put on a steroid inhaler recently. I use it like an inhaler but swallow the air instead of breathing it in. You may want to look into EOE and it's relationship to celiac. Just a thought. My swallowing and celiac seem to be related.

You have eat gluten every single day until after testing. And the celiac blood test is supposed to be done as well.