23010 Celiac Disease in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus - Celiac.com
No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Celiac Disease in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Celiac.com 08/20/2012 - People with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) suffer from celiac disease at rates ranging from 4.4 to 11.1%, compared with rates of 0.5% for the general population.

Photo: CC--DeathByBokehThe reason for this connection is due at least in part to the fact that the HLA genotypes DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, while DR3-DQ2 is associated with celiac disease.

To get a better sense of the issue, a research team recently assessed celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

The research team included Maria Erminia Camarca, Enza Mozzillo, Rosa Nugnes, Eugenio Zito, Mariateresa Falco, Valentina Fattorusso, Sara Mobilia, Pietro Buono, Giuliana Valerio, Riccardo Troncone, and Adriana Franzese.

The are variously affiliated with the Department of Paediatrics, "Federico II" University, the School of Movement Sciences (DiSIST) at Parthenope University, and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pathology "L. Califano", "Federico II" University, all in Naples, Italy.

People with T1D rarely show classical severe symptoms of celiac disease. Usually, they have few or mild symptoms of celiac disease, or show no symptoms at all (silent CD).

Ads by Google:

In fact for T1D patients, diagnosis of celiac disease is usually done by blood screening.

The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD) on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial.

There is some debate about whether gluten-free foods have a higher glycemic index compared with to gluten-containing foods; and also about whether gluten-free foods might be be lower in fiber and higher in fat.

Adherence to a gluten-free diet by children with CD-T1D has generally been reported at below 50%, compared with about 73% for those with celiac disease alone. Failure to follow a gluten-free diet is even more common among asymptomatic patients.

The more severe problems of gluten-free diet adherence usually occur during adolescence when non-compliant subjects report the lowest quality of life.

The researchers suggest providing psychological and educational support for these patients.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

You may find these interesting, they're from Professor Marios Hadjivassiliou, a leading expert on gluten ataxia: http://www.acnr.co.uk/pdfs/volume2issue6/v2i6reviewart2.pdf Best of luck helping your daughter

Yep. The one that is most relevant I think is the post by Backtalk. Backtalk went back on gluten and have to a colostomy done on an emergency basis. Not fun. She regretted ignoring the gluten-free diet.

Welcome Lochella Hopefully you can draw some comfort from finally having an answer and thus starting the path to good health. Healing is going to come from your own body as you progress on the gluten free diet and it stops fighting itself and starts repairing that damage. You're still in the very early days and it's not an instant process sadly. 6 months is the usual figure bandied around for seeing significant improvement, although hopefully you'll get some signs of improvement much quicker than that. The single best thing you can do is to eat good simple whole foods and make sure absolutely no gluten gets into your diet. There's some tips here: With stomach pains peppermint tea is my go to drink. Avoiding caffeine seems to help as well as its rough on digestion at the best of times. This may be a time to ease up on alcohol as well and consider dropping dairy, many find they're lactose intolerant but this can correct itself in time. You will find lots of good info, advice and support here, I hope the community is of help to you as it was to me. Best of luck!

I recently got diagnosed with Celiac disease I must of had it my whole life. I'm 35 I've always had severe stomach problems, in and out of hospitals and misdiagnosed until now. My small intestine is severely damaged I'm now waiting to see a dietitian and my specialist wants to see me again in 2 weeks. How do some of you deal with the pain of the healing process and what helps you? I'm in so much pain?

I recently got diagnosed with Celiac disease I must of had it my whole life, in 35 I've always had severe stomach problems in and out of hospitals and misdiagnosed until now. My small intestine is severely damaged in now waiting to see a dietitian and my specialist wants to see me again in 2 weeks. How do some of you deal with the pain of the healing process and what helps you? I'm in so much pain?