23023 Canada Requires All Food Labels to Declare Gluten, Other Allergens - Celiac.com
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Canada Requires All Food Labels to Declare Gluten, Other Allergens

Celiac.com 08/31/2012 - Since August 4th, 2012, Canadian Food Allergen Labeling Regulations require all food products containing gluten, or any of ten other major allergens, to clearly state their presence on the label.

Photo: Jefferson AdamsThis change marks an important step in consumer safety that will benefit the estimated three million Canadians with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, as well as others with sensitivities to major food allergens.

For people with celiac disease, consuming gluten can cause anemia, nutritional deficiencies, a blistering skin rash, and an increased risk of other autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes. It can also lead to some cancers of the gut.

One major problem for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is that, unless clearly stated on the label, it can be difficult to tell whether or not gluten is present in foods they may buy.

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A 2009 Health Canada survey of approximately 7,000 people revealed that 96.1% of individuals read every ingredient on all food products to figure out whether the product contains gluten.

Nearly eighty percent of those surveyed said that their greatest challenge was with incomplete labeling.

For people who are sensitive to gluten and/or other major allergens, this new labeling rule will remove much of the guesswork from grocery shopping, and substantially reduce the risk to individuals sensitive or intolerant to gluten or other allergens.

Those risks include an estimated 14,000 emergency hospital wards each year that are the result of reactions to gluten and other allergens, which carry a projected $5 million in extra health care costs.

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9 Responses:

 
Susan
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said this on
31 Aug 2012 8:16:56 AM PDT
This is good news for Canadians. I wonder if the product in the picture is really gluten-free if it contains mixed tocopherols. Do celiacs still need to worry that some of the vitamin E might come from wheat germ even though the product claims it is gluten-free?

 
cate
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said this on
03 Sep 2012 1:19:53 PM PDT
Good question from Susan. Here in Australia, I've discovered that if it isn't actually an 'ingredient' then it doesn't always get on the label, e.g. flour used to stop food items sticking together during processing or in packaging. Good on you, though, to the Canadian government.

 
Barb
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said this on
03 Sep 2012 2:21:09 PM PDT
The above is not gluten free. The definition of gluten is sadly lacking.

All grains have gluten in them and since it has rice in it, it is not gluten free. Yes, It is a different form of gluten but the body can't tell the difference.

 
Jefferson
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said this on
06 Sep 2012 2:13:21 PM PDT
I am unaware of any study that shows that the bodies of people with celiac disease react the same to rice gluten as to the gluten in wheat, barley or rye? I am also not aware of any study that indicates that rice gluten provokes any adverse reaction in people with celiac disease. Perhaps you could cite your sources for this (mis)information?

 
Ted
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said this on
28 Oct 2012 11:00:20 AM PDT
Wrong. Rice doesn't contain glutenin and gliadin which are the proteins that celiacs and gluten intolerant people react to.

 
TheWendybird
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said this on
03 Sep 2012 11:53:44 PM PDT
I'm originally from Canada and go back at least once a year to visit family. I'd be very interested to know if their labeling for gluten will include if it's made on the same lines/cross contamination etc.

 
jacobite
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said this on
04 Sep 2012 7:00:52 AM PDT
What a pity that Canada, unlike the EU, has still not seen fit to label GMO foods.

 
Richie
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said this on
04 Sep 2012 12:35:54 PM PDT
Curious that an article about Canadian food labels shows an American food label with a gluten-free product in it. It should show a Canadian label with allergens in it to demonstrate the headline of this article. We need all the help we can get!

 
Rebecca Black
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said this on
19 Sep 2012 8:41:32 AM PDT
This is wonderful! I wish this would happen in the USA.




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So as many of you might know at only 6 weeks Gluten Free we were shocked to see how many Neurological Issues were resolved for our daughter. It was shocking and amazing. We quickly began to realize that the difficulty swallowing, the Vertigo, the sensory issues were ALL Gluten related. Now in the last 2 weeks it all slipped away and she is almost entirely back to the way she was before we went Gluten Free. We have a pretty good idea why and are taking the steps to remedy it. BUT...it struck me that (for HER sake and the sake of her long term medical records) I need to get the Gluten Ataxia recognized. I realize now how fragile her health is and how hard she will have to fight to STAY healthy. And worse - potentially EVERY cross contamination will take her out for weeks and make her employment opportunities shaky and vulnerable. My Dr. agrees and is sending us to the McMaster Neurological Department (they are cutting edge, up on all that is new etc) to see if they are willing to work with us. She just put the referral in so I have no idea what will come from it. It my result in nothing? Or she may get a Gluten Ataxia diagnosis? I'm not sure but it is worth fighting for.

In my research, diabetes (type 2) is genetic. You either have the genes to develop diabetes or you do not. Additional weight is most likely due to insulin resistance. I happen to be a thin diabetic. I have never been heavy. I was brought up to consume the Standard American diet (SAD) full of process and sugary foods. The problem most celiacs have is that they just simply convert the SAD diet into a gluten free diet. I disagree. We need to consume foods that naturally contain nutrients that are good for us. Fortified foods were only developed during the last century. In the 20's they added iodine to salt to prevent thyroid disease (goiters). In the 30's they added Vitamin D to prevent rickets (fortified milk was better than that nasty cod liver oil). In the 40's they started fortifying flour. Why? They found that kids entering into the military during WWII were malnourished. Yes. They were malnourished. Remember, the Great Depression preceded the war. Read more: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK208880/ I consume very few grains because I do have diabetes. I eat fresh veggies (full of fiber), meats, fruit, eggs, and dairy along with plenty of fat (which does not raise blood sugar). I do occasionally fall of the wagon, but never the gluten-free wagon! Granted this diet is not for everyone. We must choose what works best for our individual health issues. But chances are we do not need to consume processed junk food in a daily basis. It is not healthy for a celiac. It is not healthy for anyone! So, everything in moderation and enjoy a varied diet.

I felt great a few weeks after going gluten-free. finally started loosing weight as well. the last few weeks I have not felt good. ok in the morning, then slowly start getting brain fog. shakes. pains. is low blood sugar a side affect of going gluten free????

I had a bone scan it didn't show any fractures, basically I left physical therapy in pain, it then went away. But my knee pain and tingling didn't go away so I tried PT again and I left it pain. Then I realized I had celiac and now all my pain is gone other then the back pain.. I'm basically worried I healed from the celiac and PT caused a whole new problem that never had to happen.

I am trying to find out if going gluten-free can cause low blood sugar. I felt so much better when going gluten-free, but now I feel weak, shaky, tired