No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Really Good Gluten-free Beef Stew

In my house, fall and winter cooking means lots of stews, soups and casseroles. Beef stew is one of my true favorites, and one that I can almost never order at a restaurant, because it almost always contains wheat, either as a thickener, or to dredge the meat for browning.

Photo: CC--tibbygirlBeef stew is a dish that goes well by itself, or which can be served over rice or gluten-free noodles for a heartier meal. Here is a recipe that will deliver a delicious gluten-free stew that will keep your hungry eaters coming back for more.

Ingredients:
2 pounds stew beef
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups water
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 gluten-free beef bouillon cube (I often use Celifibr's Vegetarian)
5 tablespoons Just Like Lipton's Gluten-Free Soup Mix (Recipe below)
3 whole cloves garlic, peeled
2 bay leaves
1 large onion, sliced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon pepper
½ teaspoon paprika
¼ teaspoon ground allspice
4-5 large carrots, sliced
3-4 potatoes, cubed
3 celery stalks, chopped
2 tablespoons cornstarch

Directions:
Heat oil in a large stew pot. Stir in meat and cook lightly until meat browns. Add water, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, bay leaves, onion, salt, sugar, pepper, paprika, soup mix, bouillon cube, and allspice.

Ads by Google:

Cover and simmer on low heat for 1½ hours. Remove bay leaves and garlic cloves.

Add potatoes, carrots and celery. Cover and cook another 30 to 40 minutes.

To thicken gravy, get a large bowl, and mix ¼ cup water and the cornstarch until smooth. Slowly whisk in 2 cups of liquid from the stew pot. Slowly stir mixture into the stew pot. Stir and cook until it reaches desired thickness.

Gluten-free Dry Onion Soup Mix

Ingredients:
1½ cups dried minced onion
⅔ cup beef bouillon powder (gluten-free)
2½ tablespoons onion powder
½ teaspoon crushed celery seed
½ teaspoon sugar

Directions:
Combine all ingredients and store in an airtight container. About 5 tablespoons equals a single 1¼-ounce package of Lipton's mix.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



4 Responses:

 
Melody
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
19 Mar 2013 1:59:58 PM PDT
This recipe of beef stew does not help when you are also allergic to corn (starch) and soy (worcestershire sauce). Substitutions would be nice to offer alongside the recipe. Please?

 
Ella
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
13 Dec 2013 12:48:35 PM PDT
Allergies are frustrating, I know, but just use Google to find alternatives for the specific items you're concerned about yourself. Lee & Perrins in the US is soy and gluten free, although I'd write or call them and ask about corn (just because it says "Natural Flavors" which usually means wheat, but obviously doesn't in this case, as they specifically state its gluten free.) and try oat or potato flour instead of corn starch. Took me less than 2 minutes to Google that info, probably about the same amount of time it took you to write that review. Unless you want to author an allergy algorithm that automatically substitutes accepted ingredients for unacceptable ingredients in every recipes (and expect a lawsuit every now and then when the alternative's ingredients change and you don't immediately update that database), don't expect any article to list every single alternative to the millions of combinations of allergies that are out there. Plus, you just may not even like the basic flavor of this particular free recipe. Experiment and write your suggestions and help others out.

 
Lynne
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
26 Aug 2013 1:14:13 PM PDT
Like the recipe for gluten-free onion soup mix

 
Courtney
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
21 Jan 2014 1:27:53 PM PDT
LOVE this recipe. My entire family loves it. I make it exactly as listed however sometimes I leave the corn starch out so it is more of a thin broth. Fantastic! Thanks for sharing.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Similarly, I've been vegetarian for 25+ years. A 2015 Nature study connecting emulsifiers with microbiome changes has me wondering about the processed foods that I ate in the past, and I wonder about the wisdom of eating as much seitan as I did. I mostly prefer my post-diagnosis diet since it forces me to consider every ingredient and to cook from scratch more.

LOL, that might put it into perspective if I explain it that way.

I am very interested in this too. My daughter tested negative for celiac, but has terrible primarily neurological symptoms. Because she tested positive for SIBO at the time and was having some GI symptoms, I was told it was just a Fodmap issue. I knew better and we have been gluten free for 2 years. Fast forward to this February. She had a SIBO recurrence that I treated at home with diet and herbal antibiotics because I couldn't get the insurance referral. She was doing great. Then stupid me brought in gluten containing chick feed for the new baby chicks we got. Feed dust everywhere. Total mess. Really, no GI symptoms (she was SIBO free by then)...but the neurological symptoms! my daughter couldn't walk for three days. Burning down one leg, nerve pain in the foot. Also heaviness of limbs, headache and fatigue. Better after three days. But unfortunately she had a TINY gluten exposure at that three day mark and had another severe reaction: loss of balance, loss of feeling in her back and arms, couldn't see for a few seconds, and three days of hand numbness, fatigue, concentration problems. Well, I actually contacted Dr. Hadjivassilou by email and he confirmed that the symptoms are consistent with gluten ataxia but any testing would require a gluten challenge. Even with these exposures, antibodies would not be high enough. His suggestion was maintain vigilance gluten free. I just saw my daughter's GI at U of C and she really only recognizes celiac disease and neurological complications of that. But my impression is that gluten ataxia is another branch in the autoimmune side of things (with celiac and DH being the other two). At this point, I know a diagnosis is important. But I don't know how to get there. We homeschool right now so I can give her time to heal when she is accidentally glutened, I can keep my home safe for her (ugh, that I didn't think of the chicken feed!) But at some point, she is going to be in college, needing to take exams, and totally incapacitated because of an exposure. And doctors state side that are worth seeing? Who is looking at gluten ataxia in the US?

Caro..............monitoring only the TSH to gauge thyroid function is what endo's do who don' t do a good job of managing thyroid disease. They should do the full panel and check the actual thyroid hormone numbers.........T3 and T4. The importance of the TSH comes second to hormone levels. In order to track how severely the thyroid is under attack, you need to track antibody levels.......not the TSH. I did not stay with endocrinologists because I found they did not do a very good job and found much greater help and results with a functional medicine MD. You should not have a goiter if your thyroid is functioning well and your TSH is "normal". Maybe they should do a full panel? Going gluten free can have a profound affect for the better on thyroid function and that is something that is becoming more and more accepted today. Ask most people with Celiac and thyroid disease and they will tell you that. My thyroid never functioned well or was under control under after I discovered I had Celiac and went gluten free. It was the only way I got my antibody numbers back down close to normal and they were around 1200 when it was diagnosed with Celiac. I was diagnosed with Hashi's long before the Celiac diagnosis. I am not sure Vitamin D has anything to do with thyroid antibodies but who knows? Maybe it does have an affect for the better. It is really hard to get Vitmain D levels up, depending on where you live. Mine are going up, slowly, even after 12 years gluten-free but I live in the Northeast in the US and we don't have sun levels like they do in the South. I take 5,000 IU daily and that is a safe level to take, believe it or not. I get no sun on my job so the large dose it is! Having Celiac Disease should not stop you from being able to travel, especially S. America. I travel, although I do agree that some countries might be very difficult to be gluten free in. You can be a foodie and travel with Celiac so no worries on that front. You may not be able to sample from someone else's plate, unless they are eating gluten-free too but I have had awesome experiences with food when traveling so you can too!

I don't know what you drank or where.... so here are a few thoughts. - sure, a dive bar might have dirty glasses and serve a cocktail in a beer glass? But a nice reminder place, with a dishwasher, should be fine. If it's a sketchy place, Stick to wine, then it's served in wine glasses that aren't used for beer or bottled ciders in the bottle. - ciders on tap might, just a slight chance, have an issue. Because of beer on tap, mixed up lines, etc. - you may have a problem with alcohol - you may have issues with The high sugar content of the drink. I know I have similar issues if I drink serveral ciders of extra sugary brands - are you positive it was a gluten-free drink? Not this " redds Apple" pretending to be a cider - it's beer with apple flavor. Or one of those " gluten removed " beers?