No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Early Infections Tied to Higher Celiac Disease Rates

Celiac.com 01/14/2013 - Sweden has seen a sharp rise in cases of celiac disease in children under two years of age. A research team recently studied the possible connection between early infections and celiac disease, along with their possible role in the explosion of celiac cases in Swedish children.

The research team included Anna Myléus, Olle Hernell, Leif Gothefors, Marie-Louise Hammarström, Lars-Åke Persson, Hans Stenlund and Anneli Ivarsson.

Photo: CC--Lab212They are affiliated with the Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine at Umeå University, Pediatrics unit of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Umeå University, the Immunology unit of the Department of Clinical Microbiology at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden, and with the International Maternal and Child Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health in Uppsala University in Uppsala, Sweden.

The team used a questionnaire to carry out a population-based incident case-referent study. The questionnaire went out to 475 cases and 950 referents, and included questions on family characteristics, infant feeding, and the child's general health.

All cases of celiac disease cases were diagnosed before two years of age, and fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

The team randomly selected referents, matched by criteria, from the national population register.

The final analysis included 373 (79%) cases of confirmed celiac disease and 581 (61%) referents, for a total of 954 children.

Ads by Google:

For each case of celiac disease, the team matched complete information on main variables of interest with one or two referents.

The results showed that children who suffered three or more parental-reported infectious episodes, regardless of type of infection, during the first six months of life faced a significantly higher risk for later celiac disease..

This risk remained after the team adjusted for infant feeding and socioeconomic status (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.0; P=0.014).

Infants who had several infectious episodes, and whose parents introduced dietary gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued faced an even greater risk (OR 5.6; 95% CI, 3.1-10; P<0.001).

This study suggests that children who suffer repeated infections before age two face an increased risk for developing celiac disease later on. The risk was even greater in children who suffered repeated infections and whose parents introduced gluten in large quantities after weening.

The team concludes that early infections probably made a minor contribution to the rise in celiac disease cases in Swedish children relative to the amounts of gluten introduced into the children's diets after weening.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



3 Responses:

 
Cheryl Bray
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
16 Jan 2013 4:16:28 PM PDT
The article doesn't mention whether those children with early infections were given antibiotics. Continued antibiotic use often triggers celiac disease and a whole host of other disease and disorder.

My daughter had many UTIs as an infant and a toddler; was given massive antibiotics up to the age of 5. She can now no longer tolerate gluten, dairy, soy, or artificial flavors or colors...

 
Shar
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Jan 2013 10:18:54 AM PDT
Cheryl's comment about her daughter sounds just like my neighbor's daughter and her problems. My celiac disease also surfaced in middle age after several infections treated with antibiotics, and several years of emotional stress at the same time. I have heard often of stress being a trigger. Kefir milk has helped a lot.

 
Gosia
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
22 Jan 2013 8:05:52 AM PDT
This article is not easy to read. The topic is so interesting to me but you totally lost me with this article. It gave hardly any information. The second to last paragraph made the most sense.
Thank you Cheryl for your comment.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Ok so is this really true?!?! Conventional? Remember, the fecal transplant was first described in the 1950s, but took decades to catch on as a conventional treatment for gut disorders, such as c-dif bacteria, partly because it was seen as crude and somehow objectionable. But it proved to wor...

You are super sweet. I'm sorry your extended family isn't great about get togethers and cards. My family is the same. Once my parents died I don't have anyone who really cares about me except for my husband and kids. My parents started getting really weird about stuff as they got older, and my si...

Wow everyone my memory lane stuff just keeps popping up on this forum!!!! Thanks for sharing the post op and Audrey the pic. I had what looked like this on my inner left ankle in my late 20's! It never got diagnosed at the time. I was seeing Dr's at time early pregnancy and then missed misc...

I can guarantee you that once you get your weight back up to normal, your period will come back. You sound really malnourished and if your weight gets too low, your periods will stop. Don't panic.......I was down to about 92-94 pounds at diagnosis so you will be able to heal if you do the diet ...

As the other's have stated, you most certainly can go on to have additional AI diseases whether or not you are Celiac or NCGS. Many AI diseases can be figured out without mainstream testing, as you know from your severe symptoms of Sjogren's. I also have Sjogren's and knew that I did without an...